White-jacket: Or, The World in a Man-of-war

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Northwestern University Press, 1970 - Fiction - 499 pages
4 Reviews
Herman Melville wrote White-Jacket; or, The World in a Man-of-War during two months of intense work in the summer of 1849. He drew upon his memories of naval life, having spent fourteen months as an ordinary seaman aboard a frigate as it sailed the Pacific and made the homeward voyage around Cape Horn.

Already that same summer Melville had written Redburn, and he regarded the books as "two jobs, which I have done for money--being forced to it, as other men are to sawing wood." The reviewers were not as hard on White-Jacket as Melville himself was. The English liked its praise of British seamen. The Americans were more interested in Melville's attack on naval abuses, particularly flogging, and his advocacy of humanitarian causes. Soon Melville was acclaimed the best sea writer of the day.

Part autobiography, part epic fiction, White-Jacket remains a brilliantly imaginative social novel by one of the great writers of the sea. This text of the novel is an Approved Text of the Center for Editions of American Authors (Modern Language Association of America).
 

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LibraryThing Review

User Review  - louis.arata - LibraryThing

It took me 63 days to finish Herman Melville’s White Jacket. Admittedly, I’m not a fast reader, and I knew I was in for some dense writing. Reading Melville is like eating buckwheat kishka – you’ve ... Read full review

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - gbill - LibraryThing

Melville’s autobiographical account of life on a man-of-war in the United States Navy in the 1840’s was an immediate success, and opened people’s eyes to the horrors of flogging, helping to get the ... Read full review

Contents

The Jacket
3
Homeward Bound
6
A Glance at the principal Divisions into which a Manofwars
8
Jack Chase
13
Jack Chase on a Spanish Quarterdeck
17
The Quarterdeck Officers Warrant Officers and Berthdeck
20
Breakfast Dinner and Supper
28
Chapters Selvagee contrasted with Mad Jack
31
Something concerning Midshipmen
216
Seafaring Persons peculiarly subject to being under the Weather
222
The People are given Liberty
225
Midshipmen entering the Navy early
230
A Shore Emperor on board a Manofwar
233
The Emperor Reviews the People at Quarters
238
A Quarterdeck Officer before the Mast
241
A Manofwar Button divides two Brothers
243

Of the Pockets that were in the Jacket
35
From Pockets to Pickpockets
38
Chapter n The Pursuit of Poetry under Difficulties
40
The Good or Bad Temper of Manofwarsnten in a great
44
A Manofwar Hermit in a Mob
50
A Drought in a Manofwar
53
Chapter is A SaltJunk Club in a Manofwar with a Notice to Quit
57
General Training in a Manofwar
64
Away Second Third and Fourth Cutters away
71
A Manofwar Full as a Nut
74
The Jacket aloft
76
How they Sleep in a Manofwar
79
One Reason why Manofwarsinen are generally Shortlived
82
Washday and Housecleaning in a Manofwar
85
Theatricals in a Manofwar
89
Introductory to Cape Horn
96
The Dogdays off Cape Horn
100
The Pitch of the Cape
104
Some Thoughts groiving out of Mad Jacks Countermanding his
110
Edging Away
115
The Nightwatches
119
A Peep through a Porthole at the Subterranean Parts of a
123
i The Gunner under Hatches
127
A Dish of Dunderftmk
131
A Flogging
134
Some of the Evil Effects of Flogging
139
Flogging not Lawful
143
Flogging not Necessary
147
Some superior old London Dock from the Hinecoolers of
152
The Chaplain and Chapel in a Manofwar
155
The Frigate in Harbor The Boats Grand State Reception
159
Some of the Ceremonies in a Manofwar unnecessary and
165
A Manofwar Library
167
Killing Time in a Manofwar in Harbor
170
Smuggling in a Manofwar
176
A Knave in Office in a Manofwar
182
Publishing Poetry in a Manofwar
191
The Commodore on the Poop and one of the People under
193
An Auction in a Manofwar
198
Purser Pursers Steward and Postmaster in a Manofwar
204
Rumors of a War and hoiv they ivere received by the Population
207
The Bay of all Beauties
210
One of the People has an Audience with the Commodore and
213
A Manofwar sman Shot at
246
The Surgeon of the Fleet
248
A Consultation of Manofwar Surgeons
252
The Operation
255
Manoftvar Trophies
265
A Manofwar Race
268
Fun in a Manofwar
274
WhiteJacket arraigned at the Mast
277
A Manofwar Fountain and other Things
282
Prayers at the Guns
287
Monthly Muster round the Capstan
292
The Genealogy of the Articles of War
297
Hefein are the good Ordinances of the Sea which wise Men oo who voyaged round the World gave to our Ancestors and which constitute the Books ...
300
Night and Day Gambling in a Manofwar
305
The Maintop at Night
310
Sink Burn and Destroy
317
The Chains
322
The Hospital in a Manofwar
325
Dismal Times in the Mess
332
How Manofwarsmen Die at Sea
335
The Last Stitch
338
How they Bury a Manofwarsman at Sea
341
What remains of a Manofwarsman after his Burial at Sea
343
A Manofwar College
345
Manofwar Barbers
350
The great Massacre of the Beards
355
The Rebels brought to the Mast
362
Old Ushant at the Gangway
364
Flogging through the Fleet
369
The Social State in a Manofwar
373
The Manning of Navies
377
Smokingclub in a Manofwar with Scenes on the Gundeck
386
The last of the Jacket
391
Cable and Anchor all clear
395
EDITORIAL APPENDIX HISTORICAL NOTE By Willard Thorp
401
Note on the Text
441
Discussions of Adopted Readings
461
List of Emendations
467
Report of LineEnd Hyphenation
471
List of Substantive Variants
479
RELATED DOCUMENTS Preface to the English Edition
487
Revised Fair Copy of Preface
489
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About the author (1970)

Herman Melville (August 1, 1819 – September 28, 1891) was an American novelist, short story writer, essayist, and poet. He is best known for his novel Moby-Dick. His first three books gained much contemporary attention (the first, Typee, becoming a bestseller), and after a fast-blooming literary success in the late 1840s, his popularity declined precipitously in the mid-1850s and never recovered during his lifetime. When he died in 1891, he was almost completely forgotten. It was not until the "Melville Revival" in the early 20th century that his work won recognition, especially Moby-Dick, which was hailed as one of the literary masterpieces of both American and world literature. He was the first writer to have his works collected and published by the Library of America.