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" In the civil law the husband and the wife are considered as two distinct persons, and may have separate estates, contracts, debts, and injuries: and therefore in our ecclesiastical courts, a woman may sue and be sued without her husband. "
The Elements of Morality: Including Polity - Page 130
by William Whewell - 1845
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Commentaries on the Laws of England: In Four Books, Volume 1

Sir William Blackstone - Law - 1807
...a witness, who is perhaps the only witness, to that very fact. IN the civil law the husband and the wife are considered as: two distinct persons ; and may have separate estates, contracts, debts, and injuries0 : and therefore, in our ecclesiastical courts, a woman may sue and...
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The British Constitution; Or, An Epitome of Blackstone's Commentaries on the ...

Sir William Blackstone, Vincent Wanostrocht - Constitutional law - 1823 - 845 pages
...a witness, who is perhaps the only witness, to that very fact. In the civil law the husband and the wife are considered as two distinct persons; and may have separate estates, contracts, debts, and injuries : and therefore, in our ecclesiastical courts, a woman may sue and be...
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Gifford's English lawyer; or, Every man his own lawyer, by John Gifford

Alexander Whellier - 1825
...she may be a witness against such her husband, in order to convict him of felony. In the civil law, the husband and wife are considered as two distinct persons, and may have separate estates, contract debts, and -injuries; and therefore, in our ecclesiastical courts, a woman may sue and be...
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Commentaries on the Laws of England, Volume 1

Sir William Blackstone - Law - 1825
...witness, who is perhaps the only witness, to that very fact. (15) IN the civil law the husband and the wife are considered as two distinct persons ; and may have separate estates, contracts, debts, and injuries ' : and therefore, in our ecclesiastical courts, a woman may sue and...
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Commentaries on the Laws of England: In Four Books, Volume 3

Sir William Blackstone, Sir John Taylor Coleridge - Law - 1825
...witness, who is perhaps the only witness, to that very fact. (15) IN the civil law the husband and the wife are considered as two distinct persons ; and may have separate estates, contracts, debts, and injuries e : and therefore, in our ecclesiastical courts, a woman may sue and...
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Journal of the Royal Asiatic Society of Great Britain and Ireland, Volumes 1-2

Asia - 1835
...marriage are not distinctly laid down in the Muhammedan law. It would seem, however, that in theory the husband and wife are considered as two distinct persons, and may have separate estates, contracts, debts, and injuries ; but in practice custom has placed the wife entirely under the power...
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The Journal of the Royal Asiatic Society of Great Britain & Ireland, Volume 1

Middle East - 1835
...marriage are not distinctly laid down in the Muhammedan law. It would seem, however, that in theory the husband and wife are considered as two distinct persons, and may have separate estates, contracts, debts, and injuries; but in practice custom has placed the wife entirely under the power...
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The Law-dictionary, Explaining the Rise, Progress, and Present ..., Volume 1

Sir Thomas Edlyne Tomlins, Thomas Colpitts Granger - Law - 1835
...note made to her during the coverture. 2 Maule 4 S. 393 : SV Ry. 4- Moo. Ca. 102. In the civil law the husband and wife are considered as two distinct persons ; and may have separate estates, contracts, debts, and injuries : and therefore, in our ecclesiastical courts, a woman may sue and be...
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The Book of the Constitution of Great Britain

Thomas Stephen - Constitutional history - 1835 - 788 pages
...evidenct, •who is perhaps the only witness to that very fact. In the civil law the husband and the wife are considered as two distinct persons, and may have separate estates, contracts, debts, and injuries. And therefore, in our ecclesiastical courts, a woman may sue and be...
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Commentaries on the Laws of England: In Four Books ; with an ..., Volume 1

William Blackstone - Law - 1836
...a witness, who is perhaps the only witness to that very fact. In the civil law the husband and the wife are considered as two distinct persons, and may have separate estates, contracts, debts, and injuries (e); and therefore, in our ecclesiastical courts, a woman may sue and...
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