On the Geology of the New Haven Region: With Special Reference to the Origin of Its Topographical Features ...

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Tuttle, Morehouse & Taylor, printers, 1870 - Geology - 112 pages
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Page 44 - Edgowood, the estate of Donald G. Mitchell, Esq. F, Fort Hale F, Ferry Point, or Red Rock, on the Quinnipiac near its mouth. J, Judges' Cave, on the West Rock ridge. L, Light House. M, Mill Rock. MP, Maltby Park, only three of the proposed lakes of which are constructed. 0, Oyster Point. P, Pine Rock. Rd, Round Hill. Rt, Rabbit or Peter's Rock.
Page 41 - TO THE ORIGIN OF ITS TOPOGRAPHICAL FEATURES: SHOWING BY SPECIAL FACTS, AND BY THE COURSE OF EVENTS, THAT THE REGION, IN THE GLACIAL ERA, LIKE THAT OF NEW ENGLAND TO THE NORTH, WAS MOULDED AT SURFACE LARGELY BY THE ACTION OF THE CONNECTICUT VALLEY GLACIER AND ITS UNDERFLOWING STREAMS, AND COVERED, THROUGH THE SUBSEQUENT MELTING OF THE ICE, WITH STRATIFIED AND UNSTRATIFIED DRIFT FORMATIONS SIMULTANEOUSLY ; THAT ICEBERGS HAD NO PART IN THE MATTER, AND THE SUPPOSED ICEBERG- SEA OVER NEW ENGLAND NO EXISTENCE...
Page 84 - The latter differ not only in their white color, but also in the absence of all pebbles, and in the much greater fineness of the sands. Through the washing of the waters against the shores, they were not only ground up, but they also lost almost entirely the oxyd of iron that tinges the quartz grains of the proper terrace formation. At the foot of the slope AB there is a collection of pebbles or stones, and for a short distance east of...
Page 67 - Such an extended change of climate over the glacier area was equivalent in effect to a transfer from a cold icy region to that of a temperate climate and melting sun. The melting would therefore have gone forward over vast surfaces at once, wide in latitude as well as longitude."!
Page 62 - ... Island are in general continued over the bottom of the Sound beneath its waters, apparently excavated for the most part out of the sand and mud deposits which constitute it; and this fact appears to indicate that the Sound was once dry land — a great east-and-west depression of the surface — into which the streams of the adjoining country flowed, and there concentrated their waters in a grand central river which received the existing Connecticut a few miles before entering the Atlantic. The...
Page 95 - For the last mile, the flooded waters of Mill River were united in one great tumultuous sea with those of western Hamden, or those of the several tributaries of Wilmot Brook, for the plain in this part has one level all the way across, a distance of three miles. Such a flood could hardly have come from any source but a melting glacier, and must have been simultaneous with the deposition of the material arranged by the waters.
Page 61 - ... Haven plain. The clay bed was evidently a mud deposit made in the harbor as it existed immediately before -the deposition of the sand ; and as the sand beds of the New Haven plain date from the era following the Glacial, the harbor very probably was that of the Glacial era. If the land then stood 1 25 feet above the present level, the mud bed would have lain just at the water's surface, like those of the present day. The evidence as to the level of the land in the Glacial era is uncertain; still...
Page 45 - WITH A MAP. 1. THE NEW HAVEN REGION. EITHER side of New Haven bay, — an indentation of the coast about four miles in depth, — there is a north-and-south range of hills, the trap and sandstone ridges of East Haven and North Haven on the east, and the eastern portion of the Woodbridge plateau on the west ; and these make the eastern and western boundaries of the New Haven region. Their height, which is greatest to the north, probably nowhere exceeds 600 feet. The width of the region varies from...
Page 95 - 108$ " 4m. " south of Mt. Carmel gap 36 " 115 " The heights above mean-tide level are obtained by adding the known height of the river at the several places mentioned (see .page 101) to the height of the terrace. The height corresponding to the position of the Whitneyville dam is deduced from that at the Suydam grounds, a sixth of a mile below. The slope of the terrace plain up to the station half a mile south of Ives's station, according to the above, is 12 feet a mile, the quotient from dividing...
Page 44 - A., Allingtown village. B, Beacon Hill. Bh, Beaver hills. Ch, Cherry Hill. E, East Rock range, consisting of East Rock proper to the northwest, Indian Head, and then Snake Rock. Ed, Edgewood, the estate of Donald G. Mitchell, Esq. F, Fort Hale. F, Ferry Point, or Red Rock, on the Quinuipiac. J, Judges' Cave, on the West Rock ridge.

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