Falconer

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Knopf Doubleday Publishing Group, Jul 26, 2010 - Fiction - 224 pages
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Stunning and brutally powerful, Falconer tells the story of a man named Farragut, his crime and punishment, and his struggle to remain a man in a universe bent on beating him back into childhood. Only John Cheever could deliver these grand themes with the irony, unforced eloquence, and exhilarating humor that make Falconer such a triumphant work of the moral imagination.


From the Trade Paperback edition.
 

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These eight plays create a brief sketch of the evolution of plays by women in the early 20th century. The selections range from one acts to full length, and cover a variety of styles. The plays ... Read full review

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Contents

Section 1
3
Section 2
6
Section 3
11
Section 4
13
Section 5
16
Section 6
24
Section 7
25
Section 8
43
Section 18
124
Section 19
135
Section 20
156
Section 21
159
Section 22
164
Section 23
168
Section 24
173
Section 25
177

Section 9
81
Section 10
83
Section 11
98
Section 12
99
Section 13
109
Section 14
110
Section 15
117
Section 16
119
Section 17
120
Section 26
179
Section 27
180
Section 28
198
Section 29
199
Section 30
201
Section 31
211
Section 32
212
Section 33
213
Copyright

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About the author (2010)

John Cheever, best known for his short stories dealing with upper-middle-class suburban life, was born in Quincy, Massachusetts, in 1912. Cheever published his first short story at the age of seventeen. He was the recipient of a 1951 Guggenheim Fellowship and winner of a National Book Award for The Wapshot Chronicle in 1958, the 1979 Pulitzer Prize for Fiction for The Stories of John Cheever, the National Book Critics Circle Award, and an American Book Award. He died in 1982, at the age of seventy.

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