Understanding Kashmir and Kashmiris

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Oxford University Press, 2015 - History - 372 pages
In 1846, the British created the state of Jammu and Kashmir (J&K) - popularly called "Kashmir" - and then quickly sold this prized region to the wily and powerful Raja, Gulab Singh. Intriguingly, had they retained it, the India-Pakistan dispute over possession of the state may never have arisen, but Britain's concerns lay elsewhere -- expansionist Russia, beguiling Tibet and unstable China "circling" J&K -- and their agents played the 'Great Game' in Afghanistan and 'Turkistan'.
Snedden contextualizes the geo-strategic and historical circumstances surrounding the British decision to relinquish prestigious 'Kashmir', and explains how they and four Dogra maharajas consolidated and controlled J&K subsequently. He details what comprised this diverse princely state with distant borders and disunified peoples and explains the Maharaja of J&K's controversial accession to India on 26 October 1947 - and its unintended consequences.
Snedden weaves a compelling narrative that frames the Kashmir dispute, explains why it continues, and assesses what it means politically and administratively for the divided peoples of J&K and their undecided futures.
 

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Contents

Introduction
1
Important Antecedents
7
Jammu and Kashmir 18461947
71
From Princely State to Disputed State
135
Contemporary and Divided JK
189
Resolving the Kashmir dispute
261
Conclusion
285
Appendixes
293
Notes
307
Bibliography
331
Index
357
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About the author (2015)


Christopher Snedden is an Australian politico-strategic analyst who has visited J&K often and interviewed many elder statesmen involved in the Kashmir dispute. He is author of The Untold Story of the People of Azad Kashmir.

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