A residence in Jutland, the Danish isles, and Copenhagen

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Page 416 - It is that of a man about the middle height — and to judge by his hair, red mixed with gray, of about fifty years of age. The forehead is not expansive ; the form of the head wide behind, denoting bad qualities, of which Bothwell, as we all know, possessed plenty ; high cheek-bones ; remarkably prominent, long, hooked nose, somewhat depressed towards the end (this may have been the effect of emaciation) ; wide mouth ; hands and feet small, well shaped, those of a high-bred man. I have examined...
Page 268 - The bird, in answer, continues singing, ' Cuckoo !' as many times as years will elapse before the object of their desires will come to pass. But as some old people live to an advanced age, and many girls die old maids, the poor bird has...
Page 416 - Concerning his grace I can say nothing, but I do not think his corpse belies the description of the French historian. And now, duly satisfied with the inspection, having first severed a lock of his red and silver hair as a souvenir, we let close the coffin-lid, and again mounted the staircase. Bothwell's life was a troubled one ; but had he selected a site in all Christendom for quiet and repose in death, he could have found none more peacefill, more soft and calm, than the village church of Faareveile....
Page 168 - Copenhagen small boys, they remain uninjured — undecorated with " spectacles on nose," or pipes suspended to their mouths. A long corridor surrounds the spot where Thorvaldsen lies interred ; the pavement tesselated ; the ceilings blue and starry ; against the walls, which are dark and in good relief, are placed many of the sculptor's largest works. It is always pleasant on entering a strange house, of whose contents you feel profoundly ignorant, to stumble on an old acquaintance : it puts you...
Page 416 - ... trap [since definitely closed] in the chancel ; a ladder leads to the vault below ; on the right lies a simple wooden coffin, encased in an outer one for protection ; the lid is removed, a sheet withdrawn, uncovered within which lies the mummy-corpse [this is altogether without proof and apocryphal] of Scotland's proudest Earl. The coffin in earlier times reposed in a vault of the chapel of the Adeler family, but was removed by the baron to its present place for the convenience of those who desire...
Page 47 - Thy need is greater than mine," he knelt down by the fallen enemy, to pour the liquor into his mouth. His requital was a pistol-shot in the shoulder from the treacherous Swede. " Rascal," he cried, " I would have befriended you, and you would murder me in return ! Now will I punish you. I would have given you the whole bottle ; but now you shall have only half.
Page 414 - Brahe ; such a changing and exchanging of manors by sale, by dowry, by gifte maal and morgen gaffue (marriage settlement) — my head, before we had finished our researches, became a very chaos.* The prison of Bothwell is now the wine-cellar of the castle, and the iron ring to which he is reported to have been attached a maniac stands inserted in the wall between two shelves of the wine-bins : on one lies crusty port, in the lower Chateau Lafitte. What a tantalizing sight for his wine-loving spectre,...
Page 354 - Frederic II. was, when we consider the age he lived in, a right-minded, honourable man. In early life he •was much attached to a young and beautiful girl, Dagmar Hardenberg by name, who, though of noble birth, belonged to no princely house ; make her his queen he could not, and he was too high principled to take advantage of her youth, so he remained a bachelor until he was thirty-eight years of age, when, yielding to the entreaties of his advisers, he much against his will contracted an alliance...
Page 413 - Bothwell, however, did not die till April 19th, 1578. According to the chaplain of Draxholm, Frederic, tormented by the demands of Queen Elizabeth and the Scotch Regent for his deliverance into their hands, allowed the report of his death to be circulated, and so put an end to all worry on the subject.* In the chronicle of Frederic II.'s reign, Resen, under the year 1578, after stating that Frederic II. caused the dead body of his father to be removed from Odense to Roskildc, continues, " At that...
Page 85 - They have always been there." Frederic II. would allow of no dissent, no Calvinistic tendencies ; the Lutheran was the recognised religion of the land, and that people must hold to, or nothing. Christian IV., his son, though he was kind to and fought for the fortunes of our " Winter Queen," the daughter of his sister Anne, never forgave his nephew for breaking the crucifixes and images at Prague.

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