The Bon Marché: Bourgeois Culture and the Department Store, 1869-1920

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Princeton University Press, 1981 - Business & Economics - 266 pages
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In this comprehensive social history of the Bon March , the Parisian department store that was the largest in the world before 1914, Michael Miller explores the bourgeois identities, ambitions, and anxieties that the new emporia so vividly dramatized. Through an original interpretation of paternalism, public images, and family-firm relationships, he shows how this new business enterprise succeeded in reconciling traditional values with the coming of an age of mass consumption and bureaucracy.

 

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Contents

New Stores
19
The Grand Magasin
48
Finance and Purchasing
53
Organization
58
Internal Relations
73
Boucicauts
75
The Base
77
Management
112
Public Relations
163
Selling Consumption
165
An Eighth Wonder
166
A Way of Life
178
Selling the Store
190
A Model Community
215
Conclusion
231
Appendix
241

Ritualization
121
Entrepreneurial Roles and Business Change
127
Directors
130
Members of a Single Family
143
Bibliography
245
Index
259
Copyright

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Page 12 - French Business and the Businessman: A Social and Cultural Analysis," in Edward Mead Earle, ed., Modern France: Problems of the Third and Fourth Republics (Princeton, 1951), pp.
Page 7 - Daniel Boorstin, The Americans: The Democratic Experience (New York: Random House, 1973...
Page 9 - Robert M. Marsh and Hiroshi Mannari, Modernization and the Japanese Factory (Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press, 1976), p. 337. 42 Yasukichi Yasuba, "The Evolution of Dualistic Wage Structure,
Page 3 - ... propriety of the goods it held within. Social historian Michael Miller's analysis of the architecture of the Bon Marche in Paris (one of the first and one of the grandest of France's department stores) is equally appropriate to Stewart's new store: "In its architecture it brought together the culture's commitment to functionalize its environment and the culture's irrepressible need to secure solidity and respectability for its works. In its values it flaunted the culture's identification with...
Page 14 - Reinhard Bendix, Work and Authority in Industry (New York: Harper and Row, 1956), pp.

About the author (1981)

Michael B. Miller is Associate Professor of History at Syracuse University.

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