Poinciana

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G.K. Hall, 1981 - Fiction - 617 pages
3 Reviews
The Palm Beach home of Ross Logan contains his celebrated collection of oriental art, and a prized new possession -- his terrified young bride.... Adorning the Florida coastline stands Poinciana, the fabulous mansion of the Logan family. Inside its regal walls a volcano of intrigue and violent emotion has begun to erupt, and not one of the Logans is safe. Especially not Sharon Hollis Logan, the lovely young bride of patriarch Ross Logan. For reasons unknown to Sharon, Ross seems to be hated by Gretchen, his daughter from a previous marriage, by her ne'er-do-well husband, Vasily, and by Ross's strange mother, Allegra -- and all their hostility is readily transferred to Sharon. But as she tries to find out why, Sharon uncovers a devastating secret about her own relationship with her husband -- a secret that, in the end, will test the limits of her courage as well as her ability to love ....

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LibraryThing Review

User Review  - JalenV - LibraryThing

Poinciana may be romantic suspense, but it also offers, through two examples, the folly of young women with mother issues so desperate for love and attention that they seek it iunwisely. The title is ... Read full review

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - JalenV - LibraryThing

Poinciana may be romantic suspense, but it also offers, through two examples, the folly of young women with mother issues who are so desperate for love and attention that they seek it unwisely. The ... Read full review

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About the author (1981)

Mystery author Phyllis A. Whitney was born in Yokohama, Japan to American parents on September 9, 1903. After her father's death in 1918, she and her mother traveled from Japan to San Francisco, California on an ocean liner. In 1924, she graduated from McKinley High School in Chicago and sold short stories to newspapers, church papers, and pulp magazines as well as worked in bookstores and libraries. She was a Children's Book Editor of the Chicago Sun's Book Week from 1942 to 1946 and the Philadelphia Inquirer from 1947 to 1948. She also taught juvenile fiction writing courses at Northwestern University in 1945 and at New York University from 1947 to 1958. She writes both juvenile and adult mysteries, many set in an exotic location. Her first juvenile book was published in 1941 and her first adult novel was published in 1943. Since then, she has written over 75 books. She has won numerous awards including the Edgar Allen Poe Award in 1961 and 1964, the Sequoyah Award of Oklahoma, and the Grand Master Award from the Mystery Writers of America in 1988. Phyllis A. Whitney passed away on February 8, 2008 at the age of 104.

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