The Cauliflower

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Register publishing Company, 1891 - Cauliflower - 230 pages
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Page 205 - Season with pepper, salt and butter ; fill the tomatoes, put on the top slices ; fill the interstices with the force-meat, pour on a little gravy, cover and bake forty minutes — then brown. CAULIFLOWER WITH SAUCE TARTARE. Boil a large cauliflower — tied in netting — in hot salted water, from twenty-five to thirty minutes. Drain ; serve in a deep dish with the flower upwards, and pour over it a cup of drawn butter, in which has been stirred the juice of a lemon, and a half teaspoonful of French...
Page 214 - Take half a dozen heads of broccoli, cut off the small shoots or blossoms and lay them aside for frying; trim the stalks short and pare off the rough rind up to the head; wash them well, and lay them in salt water for an hour; then put them into plenty of boiling water (salted) and let them boil fast till quite tender. Put two ounces of butter into a saucepan, and stir it over a slow fire till it is melted; then add gradually six or eight well-beaten eggs, and stir the mixture until it is thick and...
Page 215 - Choose such as are firm, yet of their full size ; cut away all the leaves, and pare the stalk; pull away the flowers by bunches, steep in brine two days, then drain them ; wipe them dry and put them into hot pickle ; or merely infuse for three days three ounces of curry powder in every quart of vinegar.
Page 216 - ... white mustard seed ; also one tablespoon black ground pepper ; let it come to a good boil in just vinegar enough to cover it, adding a little alum. Drain again, and when cold, mix in...
Page 212 - Take the white part of a boiled cauliflower after it is cold ; chop it very small and mix with it a sufficient quantity of well-beaten egg, to make a very thick batter ; then fry it in fresh butter in a small pan, and send it hot to table.
Page 204 - ... ounces of butter; put grated bread over the top, dot it with small bits of butter, and place it in the oven to heat thoroughly and brown. Serve in same dish in which it was baked. This is a good way to use common heads. A nicer way is to boil them, then place them whole in a buttered dish with stems down. Make...
Page 215 - ... two days, then drain them, and, when quite dry, put them into clean dry jars, and cover them with hot pickle, in every quart of which has been steeped one ounce each of horseradish sliced, black pepper, allspice, and salt, with or without mustard seed. In all pickles the vinegar should always be two inches or more above the vegetables, as it is sure to shrink, and if the vegetables are not thoroughly immersed in pickle they will not keep.
Page 218 - Put f of the butter in a sauce pan over the fire. As soon as it melts, add the flour ; stir till blended. Be careful not to let it brown. Add the boiling milk, by degrees, to the flour and butter, stirring without ceasing. Boil 3 minutes. Remove from the fire; add salt, white pepper, and the rest of the butter; stir until the butter melts, and serve immediately. If it has to be kept, set it over a kettle of boiling water...
Page 204 - Cauliflower with Stuffing Choose a saucepan the exact size of the dish intended to be used. Cleanse a large, firm, white cauliflower, and cut it into sprigs; throw these into boiling salt and water for two minutes ; then take them out, drain, and pack them tightly with the heads downward, in the saucepan, the bottom of which must have been previously covered with thin slices of bacon. Fill up the vacant spaces with a stuffing made of 3...
Page 77 - If this most delicate and most valuable member of the brassica family would "carry" more safely, at locations suitable for its cultivation, it would be one of the most important crops of the truck farmer. Although so located, I have abandoned its culture, notwithstanding I have netted as high as $24.75 in New York per barrel for it, and the heads or " curd " have sold at a gross average of 37.9 cents each. Sometimes, however, it would continue to arrive in such bad order as not...

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