The Eventful Narrative of Capt. William Stockell, of His Travels, of His Various and Signal Engagements in the Land and Naval Service of His Britannic Majesty, and of the United States: And of His Adventures and Achievements in the Whale Fishery

Front Cover
S. Ward & Company, 1840 - Adventure - 326 pages
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 255 - Presently she arose close by the fast-boat ; and seizing the young one, dragged about a hundred fathoms of line out of the boat with remarkable force and velocity. Again she arose to the surface ; darted furiously to and fro ; frequently stopped short, or suddenly changed her direction, and gave every possible intimation of extreme agony. For a length of time she continued thus to act, though closely pursued by the boats; and, inspired with courage and resolution by her concern for her offspring,...
Page 151 - A vessel under weigh is seldom or never attacked. Several of the marauders attack together, and station themselves under the bows and quarters of a ship when she has no longer steerage way, and is incapable of pointing her guns. The action continues often for several hours, doing very little mischief; but when the crew are exhausted with the defence, or have expended their ammunition, the pirates take this opportunity of boarding in a mass. This may suggest the best means of defence. A ship, when...
Page 151 - The Malay piratical proas are from six to eight tons burden, and run from six to eight fathoms in length. They carry from one to two small guns, with commonly four swivels or rantakas to each side, and a crew of from twenty to thirty men. When they engage, they put up a strong bulwark of thick plank; the Illanoon proas are much larger and more formidable, and commonly carry from four to six guns, and a...
Page 130 - Aurungabad, and connected with the main land by a causeway constructed in 1805. This city is one of the three presidencies of the English East India Company. It has a strong fort, a dock yard, and marine arsenal. The finest merchant-ships are built here, all of teak.
Page 212 - ... but even the minutest living creatures are detained by it, and are made, in so many successive accumulations, to form mouthful after mouthful to the mighty destroyer. The eyes of the whale are placed almost immediately above the corners of the mouth. They are singularly disproportionate to the size of the animal, being scarcely larger than those of an ox. No trace of an ear is to be discerned till after the removal of the skin ; and the hearing of the whale is, accordingly, very imperfect. On...
Page 212 - ... name of whalebone. The blades are broadest at their upper extremity, where they are inserted in the gum, and are of greatest length in the middle of the series or row on each side of the mouth. The greatest length varies from ten to fifteen feet; and the breadth at the gum is usually, In a full-grown fish, from ten to twelve inches. ' There are upwards of three hundred blades in each series, or side of bone, as the whale-fishers term it. The use of this part of its structure to the animal is...
Page 151 - ... impartial in the selection of their prey, making little choice between natives and strangers, giving always, however, a natural preference to the most timid, and the most easily overcome. When an expedition is undertaken by the Malay pirates, they range themselves under the banner of some piratical chief noted for his courage and conduct. The native prince of the place where it is prepared, supplies the adventurers with arms, ammunition and opium, and claims as his share of the plunder, the female...
Page 151 - ... with the defence, or have expended their ammunition, the pirates take this opportunity of boarding in a mass. This may suggest the best means of defence. A ship, when attacked during a calm, ought perhaps rather to stand upon the defensive, and wait, if possible, the setting in of the sea-breeze, than attempt any active operations, which would only fatigue the crew, and disable them from making the necessary defence when boarding is attempted.
Page 212 - ... from ten to fifteen feet; and the breadth at the gum is usually, In a full-grown fish, from ten to twelve inches. ' There are upwards of three hundred blades in each series, or side of bone, as the whale-fishers term it. The use of this part of its structure to the animal is to serve as a net or sieve in which to collect its food. As it proceeds with distended jaws through the ocean, the water rushes through this sieve ; but even the minutest living creatures are detained by it, and are made,...
Page 250 - The suhstance of the sclerotic coat of the eye is peculiar, heing a hard thick cartilage through which the optic nerve passes as in other animals. When cleaned of their contents, those tunies, or more properly sockets, appear like small shallow cups of griulo.

Bibliographic information