The South Seas (Melanesia)

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Page 28 - ... in two flames, the one on one side, and the other on the other side of the axial line.
Page 68 - THE religion of the Melanesians is the expression of their conception of the supernatural, and embraces a very wide range of beliefs and practices, the limits of which it would be very difficult to define. It is equally difficult to ascertain with precision what these beliefs are. The ideas of the natives are not clear upon many points, they are not accustomed to present them in any systematic form among themselves.
Page 70 - It is a power or influence, not physical, and, in a way, supernatural ; but it shows itself in physical force, or in any kind of power or excellence which a man possesses. This Mana is not fixed in anything, and can be conveyed in almost anything ; but spirits, whether disembodied souls or supernatural beings, have it, and can impart it ; and it essentially belongs to personal beings to originate it, though it may act through the medium of water, or a stone, or a bone.
Page 69 - There is a belief in a force altogether distinct from physical power, which acts in all kinds of ways for good and evil, and which it is of the greatest advantage to posses or control.
Page 69 - The religion of the Melanesians consists, as far as belief goes, in the persuasion that there is a supernatural power about, belonging to the region of the unseen ; and, as far as practice goes, in the use of means of getting this power turned to their own benefit. The notion of a Supreme Being is altogether foreign to them, or indeed of any Being occupying a very elevated place in their world
Page 87 - CAP ADVENTURES Being the Second Series of Red Cap Tales Stolen from the Treasure-Chest of the Wizard of the North 16 full-page Illustrations...
Page 73 - This is about the women that they say belonged to heaven, and had wings like birds ; and they came down to earth to bathe in the sea, and when they bathed they took off their wings. And as Qatu was going about, he chanced to see them ; and he took up one pair of wings and went back into the village and buried them at the foot of the main pillar of his house. Then he went back again and watched them. And when they had finished bathing they went and took up their wings and flew up to heaven ; but one...
Page 70 - ... anything; but spirits, whether disembodied souls or supernatural beings, have it and can impart it; and it essentially belongs to personal beings to originate it, though it may act through the medium of water, or a stone, or a bone. All Melanesian religion consists, in fact, in getting this Mana for one's self, or getting it used for one's benefit — all religion, that is, as far as religious practices go, prayers and sacrifices.
Page 73 - With all this it is impossible to take Qat very seriously or to allow him divine rank. He is certainly not the lord of spirits. He is the hero of story-tellers, the ideal character of a good-natured people who profoundly believe in magic and greatly admire adroitness and success in the use of it ; Qat himself is good-natured, only playfully mischievous, and thoroughly enjoys the exercise of his wonderful powers1.
Page 60 - Protestant, with all their gross blots, with all their deficiency of candor, of humor, and of common sense, the missionaries are the best and most useful whites in the Pacific.

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