Distortions

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Knopf Doubleday Publishing Group, Apr 20, 2011 - Fiction - 288 pages
4 Reviews
Haunting and disturbingly powerful, these stories established Ann Beattie as the most celebrated new voice in American fiction and an absolute master of the short-story form. Beattie captures perfectly the profound longings that came to define an entire generation with insight, compassion, and humor.


From the Trade Paperback edition.
 

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Review: Distortions

User Review  - Goodreads

Another great collection. I liked the ones in the second half better than those in the first. Especially fine are “Wolf Dream” and “Wanda's.” Very 1970s yet timeless and literary in quality. Read full review

Review: Distortions

User Review  - Goodreads

i like this so much. have been feeling maybe 'unexcited' or something by reading recently. read some of these stories and feel very 'excited' about reading and other things. 'excited/unexcited' doesnt seem like quite the right word. Read full review

Contents

Snakes Shoes
Fancy Flights
Imagined Scenes
Wally WhistlesDixie
Marshalls Dog
Downhill
Hale Hardyand the AmazingAnimal Woman
Four StoriesAbout Lovers
Wolf Dreams
Wandas
TheParking Lot
Vermont
Gaps
Its JustAnother Dayin Big Bear CityCalifornia
Victor Blue
The Lifeguard

A PlatonicRelationship
Eric ClaptonsLover
ABOUT THE AUTHOR
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About the author (2011)

Born in 1947, Ann Beattie grew up in the suburbs of Washington, D.C., attended college at American University, and went on to do graduate work in English literature at the University of Connecticut. She began writing stories out of frustration with her doctoral work. After rejecting twenty-two submissions, The New Yorker published Beattie's "A Platonic Relationship" in 1974, and Beattie became a regular contributor to the magazine. Her first collection of stories, Distortions, and her first novel, Chilly Scenes of Winter, appeared simultaneously in 1976 and initiated a long-standing critical debate as to whether Beattie's greater strength is in the story or the novel. All critics agree, however, on the uniqueness of her style and her uncanny ability to expose certain truths about contemporary life, particularly as it lived by those of her own generation and social class. She lives in Maine and Key West with her husband, the painter Lincoln Perry.


From the Trade Paperback edition.

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