American Woman's Home

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Applewood Books, 2008 - Cooking - 524 pages
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Published in 1869 by the indomitable Beecher sisters, The American Woman's Home is remarkable for both its philosophy and its practicality. A pioneering work of scientific kitchen planning, the book's recommendation for specific work areas, built-in cupboards and shelves, and continuous work surfaces are ideals that, while new at the time, are taken for granted today. The work presupposes a servantless home and teaches the homemaker basic skills on how to cope with such inventions as stoves and refrigerators, as well as providing information on healthful food and drink, care of the sick, and care of the home. While the few recipes included are mainly medicinal, this is an important work of social and food history.
 

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Contents

I
13
II
17
III
23
IV
43
V
59
VI
66
VII
84
VIII
104
XXI
255
XXII
263
XXIII
275
XXIV
287
XXV
303
XXVI
307
XXVII
335
XXVIII
348

IX
113
X
119
XI
138
XII
150
XIII
158
XIV
167
XV
191
XVI
197
XVII
212
XVIII
220
XIX
233
XX
247
XXIX
353
XXX
360
XXXI
367
XXXII
379
XXXIII
384
XXXIV
389
XXXV
393
XXXVI
403
XXXVII
419
XXXVIII
433
XXXIX
453

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About the author (2008)

Harriet Beecher was born in Litchfield, Connecticut, one of nine children of the distinguished Congregational minister and stern Calvinist, Lyman Beecher. Of her six brothers, five became ministers, one of whom, Henry Ward Beecher, was considered the finest pulpit orator of his day. In 1832 Harriet Beecher went with her family to Cincinnati, Ohio. There she taught in her sister's school and began publishing sketches and stories. In 1836 she married the Reverend Calvin E. Stowe, one of her father's assistants at the Lane Theological Seminary and a strong antislavery advocate. They lived in Cincinnati for 18 years, and six of her children were born there. The Stowes moved to Brunswick, Maine, in 1850, when Calvin Stowe became a professor at Bowdoin College. Long active in abolition causes and knowledgeable about the atrocities of slavery both from her reading and her years in Cincinnati, with its close proximity to the South, Stowe was finally impelled to take action with the passage of the Fugitive Slave Act in 1850. By her own account, the idea of Uncle Tom's Cabin (1852) first came to her in a vision while she was sitting in church. Returning home, she sat down and wrote out the scene describing the death of Uncle Tom and was so inspired that she continued to write on scraps of grocer's brown paper after her own supply of writing paper gave out. She then wrote the book's earlier chapters. Serialized first in the National Era (1851--52), an important abolitionist journal with national circulation, Uncle Tom's Cabin was published in book form in March 1852. It was an immediate international bestseller; 10,000 copies were sold in less than a week, 300,000 within a year, and 3 million before the start of the Civil War. Family legend tells of President Abraham Lincoln (see Vol. 3) saying to Stowe when he met her in 1862: "So this is the little lady who made this big war?" Whether he did say it or not, we will never know, since Stowe left no written record of her interview with the president. But he would have been justified in saying it. Certainly, no other single book, apart from the Bible, has ever had any greater social impact on the United States, and for many years its enormous historical interest prevented many from seeing the book's genuine, if not always consistent, literary merit. The fame of the novel has also unfortunately overshadowed the fiction that Stowe wrote about her native New England: The Minister's Wooing (1859), Oldtown Folks (1869), Poganuc People (1878), and The Pearl of Orr's Island (1862), the novel that, according to Sarah Orne Jewett, began the local-color movement in New England. Here Stowe was writing about the world and its people closest and dearest to her, recording their customs, their legends, and their speech. As she said of one of these novels, "It is more to me than a story. It is my resume of the whole spirit and body of New England.

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