The New York Times Essential Library: Jazz: A Critic's Guide to the 100 Most Important Recordings

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Macmillan, Nov 6, 2002 - Music - 250 pages
19 Reviews
A connoisseur's tour through the great American art form

A Love Supreme. Miles Ahead. Brubeck Time. Yardbird Suite. The Sidewinder. For newcomers just beginning their library of recordings, and for longtime fans looking to deepen their understanding, New York Times jazz critic Ben Ratliff offers an assertive, deeply knowledgeable collector's guide, full of opinions and insights on the one hundred greatest recorded works of jazz.

From the rare early recordings of Louis Armstrong, through Duke Ellington, Benny Goodman's seminal Carnegie Hall concert, and the lions of the bebop era, to the transformative Miles Davis and several less-canonized artists, such as Chano Pozo, Jimmy Giuffre, and Greg Osby, who have made equally significant contributions, Ratliff places each recording in the greater context and explains its importance in the development of the form. Taken together, these original essays add up to a brief history of jazz, highlighting milestone events, legendary players, critical trends, and artistic breakthroughs.
  

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Review: The New York Times Essential Library- Jazz: A Critic's Guide to the 100 Most Important Recordings

User Review  - Brian - Goodreads

If you want to understand jazz and why it matters, this is your introduction (and of course seasoned scholars will do well to peruse as well). Ratliff's style is easy and immediate, like talking up a ... Read full review

Review: The New York Times Essential Library- Jazz: A Critic's Guide to the 100 Most Important Recordings

User Review  - Goodreads

If you want to understand jazz and why it matters, this is your introduction (and of course seasoned scholars will do well to peruse as well). Ratliff's style is easy and immediate, like talking up a ... Read full review

Contents

FLETCHER HENDERSON A Study
9
LOUIS ARMSTRONG The Complete
23
BENNY GOODMAN The Complete
30
LESTER YOUNG The Kansas City
39
DUKE ELLINGTON The BlantonWebster
47
JOHN KIRBY AND HIS ORCHESTRA
51
MARY LOU WILLIAMS Zodiac Suite
65
DJANGO REINHARDT Djangology 49 1949
78
JOHN COLTRANE QUARTET A Love Supreme 1964
166
ANDREW HILL Point of Departure 1964
168
WAYNE SHORTER Speak No Evil 1964
170
MILES DAVIS The Complete Live at the Plugged Nickel 1965Highlights from the Plugged Nickel 1965
172
HERBIE HANCOCK Maiden Voyage 1965
174
MOACIR SANTOS Coisas 1965
176
ARCHIE SHEPP Fire Music 1965
178
The Complete Impulse Recordings 19651967
181

GERRY MULLIGAN The Complete Pacific
83
The Complete
97
ART TATUM The Tatum Group Masterpieces
110
x
114
BILLIE HOLIDAY Songs for Distingue
115
ART PEPPER Art Pepper Meets the Rhythm
121
SUN RA AND HIS ARKESTRA Jazz
128
CHARLES MINGUS Blues and Roots 1959
135
MILES DAVIS WITH JOHN COLTRANE
141
JIMMY GIUFFRE 3 1961
148
JEANNE LEE AND RAN BLAKE The Newest Sound Around 1961
151
ABBEY LINCOLN Straight Ahead 1961
153
DUKE ELLINGTON Money Jungle 1962
157
The Complete Columbia Solo Studio Recordings
159
STAN GETZ AND JOAO GILBERTO GetzGilbertol963
161
DEXTER GORDON Our Man in Paris 1963
163
JOHN COLTRANE QUARTET Crescent 1964
165
DUKE ELLINGTON The Far East Suite Special Mix 1966
183
ROSCOE MITCHELL SEXTET Sound 1966
185
JOHN COLTRANE Interstellar Space 1967
188
McCOY TYNER The Real McCoy 1967
190
JAKI BYARD The Jaki Byard Experience 1968
193
MILES DAVIS Get Up with It 197O1974
195
MAHAVISHNU ORCHESTRA The Inner Mounting Flame 1971
197
EDDIE PALMIERI AND HIS ORCHESTRA Vamonos Pal Monte 1971
199
EARL HINES Earl Hines Plays Duke Ellington 19711975
201
JULIUS HEMPHILL Dogon A D 1972
203
PAT METHENY Bright Size Life 1975
205
EVAN PARKER Monoceros 1978
207
BETTY CARTER The Audience with Betty Carter 1979
209
STEVE COLEMAN AND FIVE ELEMENTS
227
1OO JASON MORAN Black Stars 2001
240
Illustration Credits
249
Copyright

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About the author (2002)

Ben Ratliff is the jazz critic at The New York Times. He lives in Manhattan with his wife and two sons.

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