The Concise Guide to Sounding Smart at Parties: An Irreverent Compendium of Must-Know Info from Sputnik to Smallpox and Marie Curie to Mao

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Crown/Archetype, Oct 10, 2006 - Reference - 336 pages
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Banish awkward silences, boring weather talk, or (worst of all) the embarrassing conversation gaff with this pithy, hilarious guide to effortless party banter.

We’ve all been there. You’re at a party, surrounded by the most important people in your life. You’re cool. You’re casual. You’re witty and urbane. Until suddenly, quite unexpectedly, things take a turn for the worse when a subject thought to be common knowledge is lobbed your way. A hush falls over the room and every head seems to swivel expectantly in your direction.
[ART: SET THESE OFF IN A DIFFERENT COLOR?]
“Rasputin. Sure, Rasputin. The Russian guy, right? Who . . . who . . . whooooo was Russian.”

“Che Guevara? You mean the dancer?”

“Oh my God! Mao Tse-tung? They have the best chicken with cashews!”
The Concise Guide to Sounding Smart at Parties was written with just this moment in mind. In fourteen pain-free, laughter-filled chapters, authors David Matalon and Chris Woolsey brush away years of cobwebs on subjects as wide-ranging as the typical round of Jeopardy: war, science, politics, philosophy, the arts, business, literature, music, religion, and more.
Armed with The Concise Guide to Sounding Smart at Parties, you’ll know that Chicago Seven wasn’t a boy band, Martin Luther never fought for civil rights, and Franz Kafka isn’t German for “I have a bad cold.” You’ll be the smart one who’s the center of conversation—and nothing beats that feeling.
 

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The concise guide to sounding smart at parties: an irreverent compendium of must-know history from Sputnik to smallpox and Mao to Marie Curie

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Designed as crib notes for engaging in intelligent conversation at social gatherings, this little gem is packed with information on a variety of topics as diverse as a typical round ofJeopardy ... Read full review

Contents

The Philosophy Conversation H
91
The Human Tragedy Conversation
109
The Art Conversation _
124
The Crime and Punishment Conversation
164
The Religion Conversation
186
The Business Conversation
205
I2 The Film and Performing Arts onversation __I
241
I4 The Music Conversation
266
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About the author (2006)

DAVID MATALON is a film and TV screenwriter and is directing his first feature film in Los Angeles. CHRIS WOOLSEY is a freelance writer who has worked for Sony Pictures and Columbia Tri-Star. Chris also tours the country as a youth speaker.

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