The Works of George Berkeley Part One

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Kessinger Publishing, Jun 1, 2004 - Philosophy - 540 pages
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1843. Part One of Two. Including his letters to Thomas Prior, Esq., Dean Gervais, Mr. Pope, etc., etc. to which is prefixed an account of his life. George Berkeley was one of the three most famous eighteenth century British Empiricists along with John Locke and David Hume. He is best known for his motto, esse is percipi, to be is to be perceived. He was an idealist: everything that exists is either a mind or depends for its existence upon a mind. He was an immaterialist: matter does not exist. He accepted the seemingly outrageous position that ordinary physical objects are composed solely of ideas, which are inherently mental. He wrote on vision, mathematics, Newtonian mechanics, economics, and medicine as well as philosophy. In his own time, his most often-read works concerned the medicinal value of tar-water. And in a curious sense, he was the first great American philosopher. Contents Volume One: Life of Bishop Berkeley; Letters, etc.; Of the Principles of Human Knowledge; Synoptical Table of Contents; Introduction; Three Dialogues between Hylas and Philonous; An Essay towards a New Theory of Vision; and Alciphron:or the Minute Philosopher, in Seven Dialogues. See other titles by this author available from Kessinger Publishing. Other volumes in this set are ISBN(s): 1417922281.

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About the author (2004)

Born and reared in Ireland, George Berkeley studied at Trinity College, Dublin, and then taught as a fellow there, eventually becoming Dean of Derry (1724) and Bishop of Cloyne (1734) in the Irish branch of the Anglican church. His primary philosophical interests included metaphysics and epistemology, the psychology of perception, philosophy of science, and natural theology. But he is best known for his defense of metaphysical idealism and denial of the existence of matter. Berkeley's best-known writings were produced relatively early in his life, between the ages of 24 and 28: They included Essay Towards a New Theory of Vision (1709), Treatise Concerning the Principles of Human Knowledge (1710), and Three Dialogues (1713). In 1728 Berkeley made a voyage to the United States in an unsuccessful attempt to found a college in Bermuda. He lived for two years at Newport, Rhode Island, and had a significant influence on American education, chiefly through his association with and donation of books to Yale University and his correspondence with Samuel Johnson, the first president of what is now Columbia University.

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