Elements of Biology: A Practical Text-book Correlating Botany, Zoology, and Human Physiology

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American Book Company, 1907 - Biology - 445 pages
 

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Page 409 - The hell to be endured hereafter, of which theology tells, is no worse than the hell we make for ourselves in this world by habitually fashioning our characters in the wrong way. Could the young but realize how soon they will become mere walking bundles of habits, they would give more heed to their conduct while in the plastic state. We are spinning our own fates, good or evil, and never to be undone.
Page 409 - Let no youth have any anxiety about the upshot of his education, whatever the line of it may be. If he keep faithfully busy each hour of the working day, he may safely leave the final result to itself. He can with perfect certainty count on waking up some fine morning, to find himself one of the competent ones of his generation, in whatever pursuit he may have singled out.
Page 409 - I won't count this time!' Well, he may not count it, and a kind Heaven may not count it; but it is being counted none the less. Down among his nerve-cells and fibres the molecules are counting it, registering and storing it up to be used against him when the next temptation comes. Nothing we ever do is, in strict scientific literalness, wiped out.
Page 319 - Men will barter gold for it ; indeed, among the Gallas and on the coast of Sierra Leone, brothers will sell their sisters, husbands their wives, and parents their children for salt. In the district of Accra, on the gold coast of Africa, a handful of salt is the most valuable thing upon earth after gold, and will purchase a slave or two. Mungo Park tells us that with the Mandingoes and Bambaras the use of salt is such a luxury that to say of a man, ' he flavors his food with salt...
Page 319 - ... ordinances of Moses, that every oblation of meat upon the altar shall be seasoned with salt, without lacking ; and hence it is called the Salt of the Covenant of God. The Greeks and Romans also used salt in their sacrificial cakes ; and it is still used in the services of the Latin church— the...
Page 61 - Jimson weed, to the exclusion of all other forms of plant life. That this is not the case is due to the fact that only those seeds which are advantageously placed can develop ; the others will, for various reasons (lack of moisture to start the young seed on its Grain ; spikes of ened flowers.
Page 328 - ... and spoils the health and the intellect. Short of drunkenness [that is, in those effects of it which stop short of drunkenness] , I should say, from my experience, that alcohol is the most destructive agent we are aware of in this country.
Page 409 - Well! he may not count it, and a kind Heaven may not count it; but it is being counted none the less. Down among his nerve cells and fibers the molecules are counting it, registering and storing it up to be used against him when the next temptation comes. Nothing we ever do is, in strict scientific literalness, wiped out. Of course, this has its good side as well as its bad one. As we become permanent drunkards by so many separate drinks, so we become saints in the moral, and authorities and experts...
Page 103 - The sap carries water and plant-foods from the roots to the leaves and from the leaves to the growing parts of the tree. That is why it is so important to keep the bark from being injured, for if the bark is cut or bruised or bored into by insects, the tree loses sap and is weakened. 8.
Page 328 - ... mostly oxidized in our body. . . . Alcohol is therefore, without doubt, a source of living energy in our body. But it does not follow from this that it is also a nutriment. To justify this assumption proof must be furnished that the living energy set free by its oxidation is utilized for the performance of a normal function. It is not enough that potential energy is transformed into living energy. The transformation must take place at the right time and place and at definite points in definite...

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