David Mamet: Language as Dramatic Action

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Fairleigh Dickinson Univ Press, 1990 - Biography & Autobiography - 241 pages
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This book supports the claim that David Mamet is possibly the first true verse dramatist by examining in detail his celebrated use of language as dramatic action. Five of Mamet's best known plays are studied in detail: Sexual Perversity in Chicago, American Buffalo, A Life in the Theatre, Edmond, and Glengarry Glen Ross.
 

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Contents

Sexual Perversity in Chicago
51
American Buffalo
85
A Life in the Theatre
119
Edmond
148
Glengarry Glen Ross
189
Conclusion
222
Notes
224
Select Bibliography
236
Index
239
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Page 36 - I write about violence as naturally as Jane Austen wrote about manners. Violence shapes and obsesses our society and if we do not stop being violent, we have no future. People who do not want writers to write about violence want us to stop writing about us and our time.
Page 49 - I'll never know, in the silence you don't know, you must go on, I can't go on, I'll go on.
Page 52 - When man confronts himself he also confronts other men. What is true of man's relationship to his work, to the product of his work and to himself, is also true of his relationship to other men, to their labor and to the objects of their labor.
Page 36 - I do all the donkeywork, in fact, and I think I can say I pay meticulous attention to the shape of things, from the shape of a sentence to the overall structure of the play. This shaping, to put it mildly, is of the first importance.
Page 26 - BOB and DON extract foodstuffs and eat. DON: Did they charge you again for the coffee? BOB: For your coffee? DON: Yes. BOB: They charged me this time. I don't know if they charged me last time, Donny. DON: It's okay. Pause. TEACH (to BOB): How is it out there' BOB: It's okay. TEACH: Is it going to rain? BOB: Today? TEACH: Yeah. BOB: I don't know. Pause. TEACH: Well, what do you think? BOB: It might. TEACH: You think so, huh? DON: Teach . . . TEACH: What? I'm not saying anything. BOB: What? TEACH:...

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