No Disgrace to My Country: The Life of John C. Tidball

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Kent State University Press, 2002 - Biography & Autobiography - 564 pages
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From his start as a West Point graduate - Class of 1848 - to his retirement as a brigadier general more than forty years later, John C. Tidball saw much that shaped the United States and its army. Having protected President Lincoln during his First Inaugural, he served with the Army of the Potomac as a battery commander, a horse artillery brigade commander, and a corps artillery commander. Beginning with the First Battle of Bull Run, Tidball saw action in nearly all the major engagements in the Eastern Theater, including Chancellorsville, Yorktown, Williamsburg, Gettysburg, Antietam, and Petersburg.
Using previously unpublished wartime letters and memoirs, Eugene C. Tidball captivates the reader with the story of his most famous relative's years in service to his country. The descriptions of battles and skirmishes offer first-person accounts of the action as well as the men he served with - men such as Irvin McDowell, Ambrose Burnside, and Henry Hunt. Tidball's account extends beyond the Civil War to include his recounting of the Supreme Court's delivery of the Dred Scott decision; his command of the military District of Alaska; his traversing the Southwest in 1853 as a member of the 35th Parellel Pacific Railroad Survey; and his service as aide-de-camp to General-in-Chief William Tecumseh Sherman.
 

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Contents

THE WAR OF THE REBELLION
11
phenomenon of intellect or for that matter of anything else
13
The Chief justice fell heavily to
26
I had gone
32
He then fairly frothed at the mouth
53
I was charmed by the openhearted
76
I had the pleasure of trampoodling through the swamps
103
During the last days mule meat
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I always managed to have the last shot
252
I have no spirit nor life left in me
271
Never has such arduous service been
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In this delightful little recreation
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Where we have to fight such bloody
331
I felt much wounded in pride
346
Take it all in all it is the sorriest
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Among such lawless
397

It was the Dred Scott decision that I
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We went out at four oclock in the morning and drilled
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From it emerged a tall lanky awkward figure
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In the minds of the South it confirmed them in its much
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We have had a good many little skirmishes
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They fight like fiends
232
The general was a man of striking
412
The cold became still more
430
As to my mental and moral qualifications I
475
Notes
495
Bibliography
546
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About the author (2002)

Tidball was a finalist for the Army Historicl Foundation's 2002 Distinguished Writing Award in the autobiography/biography category.

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