Memoirs of the Kings of Spain of the House of Bourbon: From the Accession of Philip V. to the Death of Charles III. 1700 to 1788. Drawn from the Original and Unpublished Documents, Volume 3

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Longman, Hurst, Rees, Orme, and Brown, 1815 - Spain
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Page 12 - We have made a motion inParliament, relative to the restitution of Gibraltar, to pass a Bill, for 'the purpose of leaving to the King the power of disposing 'of that fortress for the advantage of his subjects. You ' cannot imagine the ferment which the proposal produced. 'The public was roused with indignation, on the simple suspicion that, at the close of a successful war, so unjustly 'begun by Cardinal Alberoni, we should cede that fortress. One circumstance greatly contributed to excite the general...
Page 12 - in Parliament, relative to the restitution of Gibraltar, " to pass a Bill, for the purpose of leaving to the King " the power of disposing of that fortress for the advan
Page 150 - Alberoni were never betrayed, even amidst the most violent ebullitions of his temper; while Ripperda discovered all the workings of his mind, by his looks and gestures, embarrassment and agitation. Finally, one was respected and dreaded in his retreat, the other despised even in the height of his authority. " But while we place Alberoni in a rank far superior, it would be unjust to withhold from Ripperda the merit of having suggested many useful schemes, which were executed by other ministers. He...
Page 12 - We have made a motion," says Lord Stanhope in a letter to Sir Luke Schaub, " relative to the restitution of Gibraltar,* to pass a bill for the purpose of leaving to the king the power of disposing of that fortress for the advantage of his subjects. You cannot imagine the ferment which the proposal produced. The public was roused with indignation...
Page 118 - ... his umpireship in Europe, for which reason he will undoubtedly engage the English nation, and unite the Dutch and other Princes in his League : they oblige themselves to seek all methods to restore the...
Page 240 - ... considered his right to the ground ; and we might as well pretend to Cadiz, in virtue of our treaties, as to the spot where the line was : it was far out of point-blank cannonshot, which was all we could justly ask.
Page 305 - January, imported, that within six weeks to be reckoned from the day on which the ratifications were exchanged, two ministers plenipotentiaries should meet at Madrid, to confer, and finally regulate the respective pretensions of the two crowns, with relation to the trade and navigation in America and Europe, and to the limits of Florida and Carolina, as well as...
Page 113 - This oneeyed scoundrel has sent back my daughter because the king would not create the husband of his harlot a grandee of Spain.
Page 284 - The Foreign Policy of England under Walpole." EHR, XVT, p. 322. Keene had written to the Duke of Newcastle, Madrid, August 23, 1728: "Ever since I returned to this country, I observed with the greatest concern, the progress Patino was making towards a powerful marine, and I have repeated it in most of the dispatches I have had the honour to write" (Coxe: Memoirs of the Kings of Spain, III, p.
Page 13 - Gibraltar a pretext to adopt other measures; and this was the cause of my coming to Paris."* Stanhope's journey proved successful : the Regent was convinced by his statements, and promised not to join Spain in urging its claims prematurely. But it was not so easy for Schaub to prevail with the Spaniards. Their impatience grew so uncontrollable...

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