The Black Tulip

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Book Jungle, 2009 - Fiction - 228 pages
Alexander Dumas (1802 u 1870) was a French writer best known for his adventurous historical novels. Dumas also wrote plays and magazine articles. His most famous works The Count of Monte Cristo, The Three Musketeers, Twenty Years After, and The Vicomte de Bragelonne first appeared in serial form. First published in 1850, The Black Tulip is set amid the political turmoil of seventeenth-century Holland. Two brothers develop a rare species of tulip. When they are unjustly accused of treason, a greedy tulip fancier sees the chance to claim the valuable discovery for himself.

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About the author (2009)

After an idle youth, Alexandre Dumas went to Paris and spent some years writing. A volume of short stories and some farces were his only productions until 1927, when his play Henri III (1829) became a success and made him famous. It was as a storyteller rather than a playwright, however, that Dumas gained enduring success. Perhaps the most broadly popular of French romantic novelists, Dumas published some 1,200 volumes during his lifetime. These were not all written by him, however, but were the works of a body of collaborators known as "Dumas & Co." Some of his best works were plagiarized. For example, The Three Musketeers (1844) was taken from the Memoirs of Artagnan by an eighteenth-century writer, and The Count of Monte Cristo (1845) from Penchet's A Diamond and a Vengeance. At the end of his life, drained of money and sapped by his work, Dumas left Paris and went to live at his son's villa, where he remained until his death.

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