Homer's Iliad: (books I., VI., XXII., XXIV.), Book 1; Book 6; Book 22; Book 24

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American Book Company, 1896 - Achilles (Greek mythology) - 120 pages
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Page 48 - Like leaves on trees the race of man is found, Now green in youth, now withering on the ground; Another race the following spring supplies; They fall successive, and successive rise: So generations in their course decay; So flourish these, when those are pass'd away.
Page 40 - Nor was his name unheard or unadored In ancient Greece ; and in Ausonian land Men called him Mulciber ; and how he fell From heaven, they fabled, thrown by angry Jove Sheer o'er the crystal battlements : from morn To noon he fell, from noon to dewy eve, A summer's day ; and with the setting sun Dropt from the zenith like a falling star...
Page 131 - This textbook may be borrowed for two weeks, with the privilege of renewing it once. A fine of five cents a day is incurred by failure to return a book on the date when it is due. The Education Library is open from 9 to 5 daily except Saturday when it closes at 12.30.
Page 61 - Yet come it will, the day decreed by fates! (How my heart trembles while my tongue relates!) The day when thou, imperial Troy! must bend, And see thy warriors fall, thy glories end.
Page 59 - No parent now remains my griefs to share, No father's aid, no mother's tender care. The fierce Achilles wrapt our walls in fire! Laid Thebe waste, and slew my warlike sire!
Page 14 - Atrides strove, Such was the sovereign doom, and such the will of Jove. Declare, O Muse ! in what ill-fated hour, Sprung the fierce strife, from what offended power...
Page 78 - My soul shall bravely issue from my breast. But first try thou my arm! and may this dart End all my country's woes, deep buried in thy heart!
Page 30 - And like a mist she rose above the tide; Beheld him mourning on the naked shores, And thus the sorrows of his soul explores. "Why grieves my son? Thy anguish let me share; Reveal the cause, and trust a parent's care.
Page 62 - O thou! whose glory fills the ethereal throne, And all ye deathless powers! protect my son! Grant him, like me, to purchase just renown, To guard the Trojans, to defend the crown, Against his country's foes the war to wage, And rise the Hector of the future age! So when triumphant from successful toils Of heroes slain he bears the reeking spoils, Whole hosts may hail him with deserved acclaim, And say, 'This chief transcends his father's fame.' While pleased amidst the general shouts of Troy, His...
Page 40 - Sheer o'er the crystal battlements : from morn To noon he fell, from noon to dewy eve, A summer's day, and with the setting sun Dropt from the zenith like a falling star, On Lemnos the' jEgean isle : thus they relate...

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