Cottage Residences: Or, A Series of Designs for Rural Cottages and Cottage Villas, and Their Gardens and Grounds, Adapted to North America

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J. Wiley, 1856 - Architecture, Domestic - 215 pages
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Page 21 - The Gothic cathedral is a blossoming in stone subdued by the insatiable demand of harmony in man. The mountain of granite blooms into an eternal flower with the lightness and delicate finish as well as the aerial proportions and perspective of vegetable beauty.
Page 52 - Here no state-chambers in long line unfold, Bright with broad mirrors, rough with fretted gold ; Yet modest ornament, with use combined, Attracts the eye to exercise the mind. Small change of scene, small space his home requires, Who leads a life of satisfied desires. What tho...
Page 18 - Every opportunity, therefore, should be taken to discountenance that false and vulgar opinion, that rules are the fetters of genius ; they are fetters only to men of no genius...
Page 10 - I went the next day to inspect more closely the building which had particularly attracted my notice, I found that its walls were of whitewashed brick, and its columns of painted wood. All the...
Page vi - For no man can bear to be entirely deprived of such enjoyments: it is only because they are not used to taste of what is excellent, that the generality of people take delight in silly and insipid things, provided they be new. For this reason...
Page vi - Men are so inclined to content themselves with what is commonest ; the spirit and the senses so easily grow dead to the impressions of the beautiful and perfect ; that every one should study to nourish in his mind the faculty of feeling these things by every method in his power. For no man can bear to be entirely deprived of such...
Page 2 - ... grows out of this primary necessity, and it is called the principle of FITNESS or usefulness. After this, man naturally desires to give some distinctive character to his own habitation, to mark its superiority to those devoted to animals. This gives rise to the principle of Expression of PURPOSE. Finally, the love of the beautiful, inherent in all finer natures, and its exhibition in certain acknowledged forms, has created the principle of the Expression of Style. In other words, all these principles...
Page viii - ... the first yet published in this country devoted to Rural Architecture, I am conscious of offering but a slight and imperfect contribution to this important subject, which I trust will be the precursor of more varied and complete works from others, adapted to our peculiar wants and climate. The very great interest now beginning to manifest itself in rural improvements of every kind, leads us to believe and to hope, that at no distant day our country residences may rival the " cottage homes of...
Page vii - What an unfailing barrier against vice, immorality, and bad habits, are those tastes which lead us to embellish a home, to which at all times and in all places we turn with delight, as being the object and the scene of our fondest cares, labors, and enjoyments ; whose humble roof, whose shady porch, whose verdant lawn and smiling flowers, all breathe forth to us, in true, earnest tones, a domestic feeling that at once purifies the heart, and binds us more closely to our fellow-beings...
Page v - A hearty desire to contribute something to the improvement of the domestic architecture and the rural taste of our country, has been the motive which has influenced me in preparing this little volume. With us, almost every man either...

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