The Child's Own English Book: An Elementary English Grammar

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J.B. Lippincott, 1920 - English language - 176 pages
 

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Page 53 - Between the dark and the daylight, When the night is beginning to lower, Comes a pause in the day's occupations, That is known as the Children's Hour. I hear in the chamber above me The patter of little feet, The sound of a door that is opened, And voices soft and sweet. From my study I see in the lamplight, Descending the broad hall stair, >o Grave Alice, and laughing Allegra, And Edith with golden hair.
Page 54 - O'er the arms and back of my chair; If I try to escape, they surround me; They seem to be everywhere. They almost devour me with kisses, Their arms about me entwine, Till I think of the Bishop of Bingen In his Mouse-Tower on the Rhine! Do you think, O blue-eyed banditti, Because you have scaled the wall, Such an old mustache as I am Is not a match for you all ! I have you fast in my fortress, And will not let you depart, 36 But put you down into the dungeon In the round-tower of my heart.
Page 51 - THE HOUSE THAT JACK BUILT This is the farmer sowing his corn, That kept the cock that crowed in the morn, That waked the priest all shaven and shorn, That married the man all tattered and torn, That kissed the maiden all forlorn, That milked the cow with the crumpled horn, That tossed the dog That worried the cat That killed the rat That ate the malt That lay in the house that Jack built.
Page 52 - That lay in the house that Jack built. This is the priest all shaven and shorn, That married the man all tattered and torn, That kissed the maiden all forlorn, That milked the cow with the crumpled horn, That tossed the dog, That worried the cat, That killed the rat, That ate the malt That lay in the house that Jack built.
Page 53 - Hour. I hear in the chamber above me The patter of little feet, The sound of a door that is opened, And voices soft and sweet. From my study I see in the lamplight, Descending the broad hall stair, Grave Alice, and laughing Allegra, And Edith with golden hair. A whisper, and then a silence: Yet I know by their merry eyes They are plotting and planning together To take me by surprise. A sudden rush from the stairway, A sudden raid from the hall! By three doors left unguarded They enter my castle wall!
Page 54 - They almost devour me with kisses, Their arms about me entwine, Till I think of the Bishop of Bingen In his Mouse-Tower on the Rhine ! Do you think, O blue-eyed banditti, Because you have scaled the wall, Such an old mustache as I am Is not a match for you all ! I have you fast in my fortress, And will not let you depart, But put you down into the dungeon In the round-tower of my heart. And there will I keep you forever, Yes, forever and a day, Till the walls shall crumble to ruin, And moulder in...
Page 48 - I've a little dog at home, and he'll know me ; If it be I, he'll wag his little tail, And if it be not I, he'll loudly bark and wail !" Home went the little woman all in the dark, Up got the little dog, and he began to bark ; He began to bark, so she began to cry, " Lauk a mercy on me, this can't be I !
Page 51 - THE HOUSE THAT JACK BUILT This is the house that Jack built. This is the malt That lay in the house that Jack built. This is the rat That ate the malt That lay in the house that Jack built.
Page 47 - When this little woman first did wake, She began to shiver and she began to shake, She began to wonder and she began to cry, '^Lauk a mercy on me, this is none of I...
Page 44 - Examples: l, my, mine, me we, our, ours, us you, your, yours he, his, him she, her, hers it, its they, their, theirs, them Directions: Underline the pronouns in each sentence 1.

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