Footlight Flashes

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American News Company, 1866 - Actors - 274 pages
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Page 45 - And let those that play your clowns, speak no more than is set down for them : for there be of them, that will themselves laugh, to set on some quantity of barren spectators to laugh too ; though, in the mean time, some necessary question of the play be then to be considered: that's villainous; and . shows a most pitiful ambition in the fool that uses it.
Page iii - The drama is the most perfect imitation of human life ; by means of the stage it represents man in all his varieties of mind, his expressions of manner, and his power of action, and is the first of moralities because it teaches us in the most impressive way the knowledge of ourselves l.
Page 268 - BURIAL, or even to lie in a CHURCH YARD ! Not ONE of them can be saved! — And THOSE who ENTER a play-house, are equally certain with the players of ETERNAL DAMNATION ! — No player can be an honest man...
Page 127 - How frequently the most eminent in tragedy or comedy, have toiled through the choicest efforts, to scanty listeners; while upon the same evenings, fantazias upon the bones, or banjo, have called forth the plaudits of admiring thousands.
Page 202 - The rapid increase in population in newly formed cities," wrote an observant visiting actor, William Davidge, "produces a style of patrons whose habits and associations afford no opportunity for the cultivation of the arts.
Page 79 - I beg to thank you for your obliging note, and its enclosure, which shall be disposed of as you desire, and as it deserves. "Let me assure you that I fully appreciate the honor you do me, not only in making my books the subject of your lectures, but in entering into your theme with so much warmth and earnestness.
Page 58 - A merrier man, Within the limits of becoming mirth, I never spent an hour's talk withal. His eye begets occasion for his wit ; For every object that the one doth catch, The other turns to a mirth-moving jest...
Page 268 - Christian burial or even to lie in a church-yard. Not one of them can be saved. And those who enter a play-house are equally certain with the players of eternal damnation. No player can be an honest man.
Page 244 - The beauty of the outside is a matter of serious astonishment, consisting of the best quality of colored plaster variegated by straight lines, which are ingeniously intended to imitate cracks. This gives it an appearance of venerable grandeur, calculated to strike the beholder with silent awe. Indeed, the munificence of its owners has spared neither plaster nor brown paint to impart to it a sombre cast, and anxious for improvement, they have changed it from its former color, which was yellow, here...
Page 34 - In consequence of the very contracted space," writes Davidge, "it was absolutely necessary to pursue the combat from the top to the bottom of the stage, and while Richard was driving Richmond up with a splendid show of head blows, he (Richmond) suddenly vanished from the sight of Richard, and the audience. In vain did the crook:backed tyrant call for Richmond to come on, if it was only to kill him. No! Richmond was too much disconcerted by his sudden mishap, and Richard, determined not to be cut...

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