Punch, Brothers, Punch: The Comic Mark Twain Reader

Front Cover
Taylor Trade Publications, 1977 - Humor - 489 pages
4 Reviews
"Punch, Brothers, Punch, a Book-of-the-Month Alternate Selection, contains both lesser-known writings and perennial favorites that reveal and celebrate Twain's genius as a satirist. Selections from The Innocents Abroad, Life on the Mississippi, The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn, and several other works are included. Meticulously restored from a variety of original sources, this text is the first to adhere to Twain's wishes in thousands of details of wording, spelling, and punctuation. Twain expert Charles Neider pared away the substandard writing and padding demanded of Twain by his publishers in order to craft the definitive collection of Twain's finest and most beloved comic pieces."--BOOK JACKET.Title Summary field provided by Blackwell North America, Inc. All Rights Reserved
 

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LibraryThing Review

User Review  - Czrbr - LibraryThing

Book Description: Garden City, New York: Doubleday, 1977. Cloth-backed boards. Very Fine/Very Fine. First Edition. 8vo - over " - " tall. A clean, bright, tight, sharp and completely unmarked copy ... Read full review

Review: The Comic Mark Twain Reader

User Review  - Allison - Goodreads

I picked essays, speeches, and letters to read based on interesting titles & beginning sentences. This proved to be an efficient method for providing laughter as I read. I'll probably check this one out again in the future! Thanks, Dad, for the recommendation. Read full review

Selected pages

Contents

The Notorious Jumping Frog of Calaveras County
1
Journalism in Tennessee
7
The Facts in the Great Beef Contract
13
How I Edited an Agricultural Paper
20
Experience of the McWilliamses with Membranous Croup
26
The Invalids Story
33
The McWilliamses and the Burglar Alarm
40
Playing Courier
47
Jim Bakers Bluejay Yarn
209
The Great French Duel
214
Cholley Adams
223
The Laborious Ant
227
Nicodemus Dodge
231
An American Party
235
American in Europe
244
Ascending the Riffelberg
252

The Fourth of July
61
Plymouth Rock and the Pilgrims
64
Woman God Bless Her
69
Glove Purchase in Gibraltar
72
Parisian Shave
75
Billfinger
77
GuideEnglish
82
Shortage of Soap
85
A Sort of People
88
A Skinning
90
An Ancient Playbill
95
Guying the Guides
101
Turkish Bath
107
That Girl in Yalta
111
Jericho
113
A Party of Eight
115
King Solomoninallhisglory
117
A Fearless Man
120
The Benton House
125
The Great Pyramid of Cheops
128
Cookery Complaints
133
A Newspaper Valedictory
134
The Cayote
140
When the Buffalo Climbed a Tree
143
A Hundred and Ten Tin Whistles
148
A Genuine Mexican Plug
153
Mr Arkansas
158
The Great Landslide Case
162
Buck Fanshaws Funeral
167
The Story of the Old Ram
175
Fetch Her Out
180
Tom Quartz
182
Blanketing the Admiral
185
The Greeley Correspondence with Erickson
193
Markiss King of Liars
200
A Practical Joke
205
The Awful German Language
277
Keelboat Talk and Manners
295
An Incognito Exploded
307
The House Beautiful
312
Manufactures
317
The Art of Inhumation
320
Pap His Own Self
324
The Duke and the Dauphin
335
Curing a Cold
340
Aurelias Unfortunate Young Man
344
The Facts in the Case of the Senate Doorkeeper
347
Female Suffrage
352
The Facts Concerning the Recent Resignation
365
My Late Senatorial Secretaryship
372
Private Habits of Horace Greeley
378
Last Words of Great Men
382
A Mystery Cleared Up
386
The Late Benjamin Franklin
388
The Reception at the Presidents
391
The Widows Protest
396
About Barbers
397
A Burlesque Biography
401
An Encounter with an Interviewer
407
The Frog Jumping of the County of Calaveras
412
Punch Brothers Punch
418
Remarkable Gold Mines
423
A Petition to the Queen of England
425
A Cure for the Blues
430
Traveling with a Reformer
447
Fenimore Coopers Literary Offenses
461
My First Lie and How I Got Out of It
473
Amended Obituaries
481
Sources
485
Index of Titles
487
Copyright

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Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 5 - ... him pretty near up to his chin — and set him on the floor. Smiley he went to the swamp and slopped around in the mud for a long time, and finally he ketched a frog and fetched him in and give him to this feller, and says : " Now, if you're ready, set him alongside of Dan'l, with his fore-paws just even with Dan'l's, and I'll give the word.
Page 6 - Frenchman, but it warn't no use— he couldn't budge; he was planted as solid as a church, and he couldn't no more stir than if he was anchored out. Smiley was a good deal surprised, and he was disgusted too, but he didn't have no idea what the matter was, of course. "The feller took the money and started away; and when he was going out at the door, he sorter jerked his thumb over his shoulder— so— at Dan'l, and says again, very deliberate, 'Well,' he says, 7 don't see no p'ints about that frog...
Page 5 - Well, I'm only a stranger here, and I ain't got no frog; but if I had a frog, I'd bet you.' And then Smiley says, 'That's all right - that's all right - if you'll hold my box a minute, I'll go and get you a frog.
Page 2 - ... initial sentence, he never betrayed the slightest suspicion of enthusiasm; but all through the interminable narrative there ran a vein of impressive earnestness and sincerity, which showed me plainly that, so far from his imagining that there was anything ridiculous or funny about his story, he regarded it as a really important matter, and admired its two heroes as men of transcendent genius in finesse.

About the author (1977)

Mark Twain was born Samuel L. Clemens in Florida, Missouri on November 30, 1835. He worked as a printer for a time, and then became a steamboat pilot. He traveled in the West, writing humorous sketches for newspapers. In 1865, he wrote the short story, The Celebrated Jumping Frog of Calaveras County, which was very well received. He then began a career as a humorous travel writer and lecturer, publishing The Innocents Abroad in 1869, Roughing It in 1872, and, co-authored with Charles Dudley Warner, Gilded Age in 1873. His best-known works are The Adventures of Tom Sawyer (1876), Mississippi Writing: Life on the Mississippi (1883), and The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn (1884). He died of a heart attack on April 21, 1910.

Charles Neider, 1915 - 2001 Charles Neider was born in 1915 in Odessa, Russia. At the age of 5, he and his family moved to the United States, settling in Richmond, Virginia. Neider later moved to New York and attended City College. In 1959, his most famous book was published entitled, "The Autobiography of Mark Twain," which was later named as one of the 100 Best Nonfiction books written in English during the 20th Century by the Modern Library. He has also edited and annotated around a dozen anthologies of Mark Twain tales, and edited the works of Robert Louis Stevenson, Washington Irving and Leo Tolstoy. Neider considered himself to be a naturalist as well as a writer. Between '69 and '77, he participated in three expeditions to Antarctica funded by the National Science Foundation and the United States Navy. He wrote about these trips in "Edge of the World: Ross Island, Antarctica" and "Beyond Cape Horn: Travels in the Antarctic." He also wrote of his own harrowing adventure when the helicopter he was flying in crashed on Mount Erebus in 1971. He wrote fiction about Billy the Kid, and the last book he wrote was a semi-autobiographical book about his struggle with prostate cancer. Charles Neider died July 11, 2001 at the age of 86.

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