The Ways of Thinking of Eastern Peoples: India-China-Tibet-Japan

Front Cover
University of Hawaii Press, 1964 - Philosophy - 712 pages
3 Reviews
First published in 1997. Routledge is an imprint of Taylor & Francis, an informa company.
 

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This is a peculiar book. The author sets out to analyze the characteristic ways of thought in India, China, Tibet and Japan by focusing on Buddhism as the common denominator. In the beginning he ... Read full review

Contents

XV
41
XVI
44
XVII
48
XVIII
52
XIX
53
XX
57
XXI
60
XXII
64
LXXVIII
230
LXXIX
233
LXXX
235
LXXXI
243
LXXXII
247
LXXXIII
249
LXXXIV
254
LXXXV
255

XXIII
67
XXIV
73
XXV
76
XXVI
79
XXVII
81
XXVIII
83
XXIX
87
XXX
89
XXXI
93
XXXII
95
XXXIII
98
XXXIV
102
XXXV
107
XXXVI
108
XXXVII
111
XXXVIII
115
XXXIX
117
XL
123
XLI
126
XLII
128
XLIII
130
XLIV
136
XLV
142
XLVI
143
XLVII
145
XLVIII
146
XLIX
147
L
152
LI
157
LII
161
LIII
165
LIV
168
LV
173
LVI
175
LVII
177
LVIII
178
LIX
180
LX
182
LXI
185
LXII
186
LXIII
189
LXIV
191
LXV
193
LXVI
196
LXVII
198
LXVIII
199
LXIX
204
LXX
206
LXXI
209
LXXII
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LXXIII
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LXXIV
217
LXXV
218
LXXVI
220
LXXVII
226
LXXXVI
259
LXXXVII
260
LXXXVIII
264
LXXXIX
265
XC
268
XCI
271
XCII
274
XCIII
277
XCIV
281
XCV
284
XCVI
286
XCVII
288
XCVIII
290
XCIX
295
C
297
CI
301
CII
309
CIII
316
CIV
327
CV
333
CVI
337
CVII
343
CVIII
345
CIX
350
CX
361
CXI
372
CXII
380
CXIII
383
CXIV
400
CXV
407
CXVI
409
CXVII
413
CXVIII
417
CXIX
426
CXX
434
CXXI
449
CXXII
467
CXXIII
481
CXXIV
490
CXXV
496
CXXVI
513
CXXVII
522
CXXVIII
531
CXXIX
539
CXXX
543
CXXXI
550
CXXXII
551
CXXXIII
557
CXXXIV
564
CXXXV
573
CXXXVI
577
CXXXVII
588
CXXXVIII
691
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Page xviii - I am come to send fire on the earth ; and what will I, if it be already kindled?
Page xviii - Suppose ye that I am come to give peace on earth ? I tell you, Nay ; but rather division ; for from henceforth there shall be five in one house divided, three against two, and two against three. The father shall be divided against the son, and the son against the father ; the mother against the daughter, and the daughter against the mother ; the mother-in-law against her daughter-in-law, and the daughter-in-law against her mother-in-law.
Page 48 - As the bees, my son, make honey by collecting the juices of distant trees, and reduce the juice into one form. 2. ' And as these juices have no discrimination, so that they might say, I am the juice of this tree or that, in the same manner, my son, all these creatures, when they have become merged in the True (either in deep sleep or in death), know not that they are merged in the True.

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