The Ancient History of Herodotus

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Derby & Jackson, 1859 - Greece
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Page 305 - Ye have heard that it was said by them of old time, Thou shalt not commit adultery: But I say unto you, That whosoever looketh on a woman to lust after her hath committed adultery with her already in his heart.
Page 54 - They afterwards, uniting themselves under the mosl solemn curses, made a private sally upon the enemy, and were every man put to death. Of those who now inhabit Lycia, calling themselves Xanthians, the whole are foreigners, eighty families excepted : these survived the calamity of their country, being at that time absent on some foreign expedition.
Page 126 - Necos, by whom he was succeeded in his authority. This prince first commenced that canal leading to the Red Sea, which Darius, king of Persia, afterwards continued. The length of this canal is equal to a four days' voyage, and it is wide enough to admit two triremes abreast.
Page 257 - XLIX. During the reign of Cleomenes, Aristagoras, prince of Miletus, arrived at Sparta : the Lacedaemonians affirm, that desiring to have a conference with their sovereign, he appeared before him with a tablet of brass in his hand, upon which was inscribed every known part of the habitable world, the seas, and the rivers.
Page 383 - And there was trembling in the host, in the field, and among all the people : the garrison, and the spoilers, they also trembled, and the earth quaked : so it was a very great trembling. 16 And the watchmen of Saul in Gibeah of Benjamin looked ; and, behold, the multitude melted away, and they went on beating down one another.
Page 93 - In the vicinity of Thebes there are also sacred serpents," not at all troublesome to men : they are very small, but have two horns on the top of the head. When they die, they are buried in the temple of Jupiter, to whom they are said to belong.
Page 104 - Sesostris made a regular distribution of the lands of ./Egypt. He assigned to each ./Egyptian a square piece of ground ; and his revenues were drawn from the rent, which every individual annually paid him. Whoever was a sufferer by the inundation of the Nile, was permitted to make the king acquainted with his loss. Certain officers were appointed to inquire into the particulars of the injury, that no man might be taxed beyond his ability. It may not be improbable to suppose that this was the origin...
Page 119 - Pelusium, so immense a number of mice infested by night the enemy's camp, that their quivers and bows, together with what secured their shields to their arms, were gnawed in pieces. In the morning the Arabians, finding themselves without arms, fled in confusion, and lost great numbers of their men.
Page 200 - Lybia, and planted some corn in the place where they happened to find themselves. When this was ripe, and they had cut it down, they again departed. " Having thus consumed two years, they in the third doubled the columns of Hercules and returned to Egypt.
Page 75 - It is my opinion that the Nile overflows in the summer season, because in the winter the sun, driven by the storms from his usual course, ascends into the higher regions of the air above Libya. My reason may be explained without difficulty ; for it may be easily supposed, that to whatever region this power more nearly approaches, the rivers and streams of that country will be proportionably dried up and diminished.

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