Arguing about Bioethics

Front Cover
Stephen Michael Holland
Routledge, 2012 - Medical - 602 pages

Arguing About Bioethics is a fresh and exciting collection of essential readings in bioethics, offering a comprehensive introduction to and overview of the field. Influential contributions from established philosophers and bioethicists, such as Peter Singer, Thomas Nagel, Judith Jarvis Thomson and Michael Sandel, are combined with the best recent work in the subject.

Organised into clear sections, readings have been chosen that engage with one another, and often take opposing views on the same question, helping students get to grips with the key areas of debate. All the core issues in bioethics are covered, alongside new controversies that are emerging in the field, including:

  • embryo research
  • selecting children and enhancing humans
  • human cloning
  • using animals for medical purposes
  • organ donation
  • consent and autonomy
  • public health ethics
  • resource allocation
  • developing world bioethics
  • assisted suicide.

Each extract selected is clear, stimulating and free from unnecessary jargon. The editor's accessible and engaging section introductions make Arguing About Bioethics ideal for those studying bioethics for the first time, while more advanced readers will be challenged by the rigorous and thought-provoking arguments presented in the readings.

 

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Contents

GENERAL INTRODUCTION
1
PART ONE Is it wrong to do research on human embryos?
3
PART TWO On what grounds should we select and enhance our offspring?
53
PART THREE Is it wrong to clone human beings?
117
PART FOUR What uses of animals for biomedical purposes are permissible?
179
PART FIVE How should more human transplant organs be acquired?
231
PART SIX What sort of consent does respect for autonomy imply?
293
PART SEVEN Is it permissible to impose on individuals for the sake of the publics health?
355
PART EIGHT How are scarce medical resources to be justly allocated?
417
PART NINE Do Western principles of research ethics apply in the developing world?
473
PART TEN Should doctors be allowed to help patients to kill themselves?
535
Index
597
Copyright

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About the author (2012)

Stephen Holland is a Senior Lecturer in the Departments of Philosophy and Health Sciences at the University of York, UK.

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