The Chicago Main Drainage Channel: A Description of the Machinery Used and Methods of Work Adopted in Excavating the 28-mile Drainage Canal from Chicago to Lockport, Ill

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Engineering News Publishing Company, 1896 - Canals - 129 pages
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Page 6 - Classification of Material. — All material excavated under the provisions of this contract is to be classified under one or the other of two heads, viz.: 'glacial drift' and 'solid rock.' "Glacial drift shall comprise the top soil, earth, muck, sand, gravel, clay, hard-pan, boulders, fragmentary rock displaced from its original bed, and any other material that overlies the bed rock. "Solid rock shall comprise all rock found in its original bed, even though it may be so loosened from the adjacent...
Page 10 - If at any time the Chief Engineer shall be of the opinion, and shall so certify in writing to the said party of the first part, that the said work or any part thereof is unnecessarily or unreasonably delayed...
Page 118 - ... windage basin,' in which large vessels may be turned around. The controlling works are located on this section. These works will consist of gates or movable dams, by which the flow of water from the main channel into the tail race, which is to deliver the outflow into the Desplaines river can be controlled. This river below Lockport follows the trough of the valley down a steep declivity to the canal basin in Joliet. The fluctuations in Lake Michigan by varying slope of water surface, will be...
Page 118 - ... appearance, long after the drainage canal was put under construction, escaped the notice of many who are interested in navigation for two reasons. Some were too busy to see anything, unless specially brought to their notice. Others thought the whole matter already fully canvassed and settled. It is true there is nothing showing that the consent of Congress had been asked for this enterprise ; certain that the subject had not been treated as an interstate affair, to say nothing of its being an...
Page 118 - Buffalo no less than 13 feet as a total possible change, between the lowest and the highest gage readings. Each lake is a basin. The water is constantly pouring in from not only one, but several inlets. The overflow, however, is now always out of the one outlet provided for that purpose; the second one formerly at Chicago, has been plugged up. As in our basins when the water rises enough to take two, three, or more of the small holes to carry it off, it is always to be noted that those holes are...
Page 118 - Engineering News anticipated the appearance of the official report by publishing in i: s issue of March 2, 1893, this report, with the permission of the chief of engineers. This publication was the first ever made in which, as a result of careful measurements, a relation between the level of the lakes and their outflow, or discharge, had been established and given to the public. Prior determination of this discharge had not attempted to detect this relation, and nothing more than a general determination...
Page 119 - ... injuriously affected by a diminution in depth, the navigability of the inner harbor of Chicago will be diminished also by the introduction of a current therein, which, in the present condition of the river, even with the minimum flow of 5,000 cubic feet per second, or 300,000 cubic feet per minute, is entirely inadmissible. The estimates of the effect of the drainage canal upon this harbor should also consider this element. The board of trustees have not yet determined upon a plan of treatment...
Page 120 - The volume flowing in this Channel will be regulated by controlling works at the lower end at Lockport, and by these means the discharge may be fixed and controlled at any amount, or entirely stopped at pleasure. Aside from its sanitary utility, the Channel is to be regarded as the most costly part of a waterway...
Page 117 - The explanation for this change of crosssection is as follows: Throughout the rock sections, and those sections in which there is a preponderance of hard material, or where rock may appear, the section adopted is designed according to law for a flow of 600,000 cubic feet of water per minute, which means provision for a population of 3,000,000 people. The narrow channel provides for a flow of 300,000 cubic feet per minute, or for about the present population of Chicago.
Page 120 - ... water of 1838 as established at Milwaukee. The law permits the channel to be developed through the earth sections on the basis of a capacity of 5,000 cubic feet per second, provided that the same is enlarged with the growth of population to the ultimate capacity set forth, viz: 10,000 cubic feet per second, said ultimate capacity being sufficient, in the view of the...

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