Physics and National Socialism: An Anthology of Primary Sources

Front Cover
Klaus Hentschel
Springer Science & Business Media, Mar 28, 1996 - Science - 406 pages
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1 Aim and General Description of the Anthology The purpose of this anthology is to introduce the English speaking public to the wide spectrum of texts authored predominently by physicists portraying the ac tual and perceived role of physics in the Nazi state. Up to now no broad and well balanced documentation of German physics during this time has been available in English, despite the significant role physics has played both politically (e. g. , in weaponry planning) and ideologically (e. g. , in the controversy over the value of theoretical ('Jewish') vs. experimental ('Aryan') physics), and even though prominent figures like the scientist-philosopher and emigre Albert Einstein and the controversial nuclear physicist Werner Heisenberg have become household names. This anthology will attempt to bridge this gap by presenting contempo rary documents and eye-witness accounts by the physicists themselves. Authors were chosen to represent the various political opinions and specialties within the physics community, omitting some of the more readily accessible texts by leading physicists (e. g. , Einstein, Heisenberg, Lenard) in favor of those by less well-known but nonetheless important figures (e. g. , Finkelnburg, Max Wien, Ramsauer). In this way we hope not only to circumvent the constricted 'Great Men' approach to history but also to offer a broader picture of the activities and conflicts within the field and the effects of the political forces exerted upon them.
 

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Contents

XXV
xcvii
XXVII
XXVIII
XXIX
2
XXX
9
XXXI
10
XXXII
13
XXXIII
17
XCI
173
XCII
174
XCIII
176
XCIV
178
XCV
181
XCVI
185
XCVII
187
XCVIII
189

XXXIV
18
XXXV
23
XXXVI
24
XXXVII
26
XXXVIII
28
XXXIX
32
XL
36
XLI
37
XLII
38
XLIII
41
XLIV
45
XLV
46
XLVI
51
XLVII
53
XLVIII
55
XLIX
58
L
59
LI
63
LII
68
LIII
71
LIV
74
LV
78
LVI
79
LVII
81
LVIII
83
LIX
88
LX
89
LXI
90
LXII
92
LXIII
101
LXIV
108
LXV
111
LXVI
113
LXVII
116
LXVIII
119
LXIX
122
LXX
125
LXXI
126
LXXII
129
LXXIII
132
LXXIV
133
LXXV
135
LXXVI
137
LXXVII
138
LXXVIII
144
LXXIX
149
LXXX
152
LXXXI
153
LXXXII
160
LXXXIV
162
LXXXV
163
LXXXVI
164
LXXXVII
167
LXXXVIII
168
LXXXIX
169
XC
170
XCIX
199
CI
212
CII
215
CIII
226
CIV
227
CV
230
CVI
231
CVII
232
CVIII
238
CIX
251
CX
253
CXI
259
CXII
260
CXIII
267
CXIV
268
CXV
270
CXVI
273
CXVII
277
CXVIII
282
CXIX
284
CXX
286
CXXI
293
CXXII
294
CXXIII
295
CXXIV
296
CXXVI
301
CXXVII
303
CXXVIII
307
CXXIX
313
CXXX
314
CXXXI
316
CXXXII
319
CXXXIII
321
CXXXIV
324
CXXXVII
326
CXXXVIII
331
CXXXIX
337
CXL
344
CXLI
348
CXLII
351
CXLIII
353
CXLIV
371
CXLVI
385
CXLVII
388
CXLVIII
389
CXLIX
392
CL
395
CLI
399
CLII
403
CLIII
i
CLIV
iv
CLV
viii
CLVI
x
CLVII
xlvi
CLVIII
lxxxvii
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Page lxxxvi - t have had the moral courage to recommend to the government in the spring of 1942 that they should employ 120,000 men just for building the thing up.
Page xxv - The German Universities failed. While there was still time to oppose publicly with all their power the destruction of the democratic state. They failed to keep the beacon of freedom, and right, burning during the night of tyranny.

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