Seize the Day

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Penguin, 2003 - Fiction - 114 pages
14 Reviews

“What makes all of this so remarkable is not merely Bellow’s eye and ear for vital detail. Nor is it his talent for exposing the innards of character in a paragraph, a sentence, a phrase. It is Bellow’s vision, his uncanny ability to seize the moment and to see beyond it.” –Chicago Sun-Times

Fading charmer Tommy Wilhelm has reached his day of reckoning and is scared. In his forties, he still retains a boyish impetuousness that has brought him to the brink of chaos: He is separated from his wife and children, at odds with his vain, successful father, failed in his acting career (a Hollywood agent once cast him as the “type that loses the girl”), and in a financial mess. In the course of one climactic day he reviews his past mistakes and spiritual malaise, until a mysterious philosophizing con man grants him a glorious, illuminating moment of truth and understanding, and offers him one last hope….

This Penguin Classics edition contains an introduction by Cynthia Ozick.

For more than sixty-five years, Penguin has been the leading publisher of classic literature in the English-speaking world. With more than 1,500átitles, Penguin Classics represents a global bookshelf of the best works throughout history and across genres and disciplines. Readers trust theáseries to provide authoritative texts enhanced by introductions and notes by distinguished scholars and contemporary authors, as well as up-to-dateátranslations by award-winning translators.


 

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Review: Seize the Day

User Review  - Doug H - Goodreads

"Be here now...." Part Wilhelm Reich lecture, part Seinfeld television episode featuring a guest appearance by Ram Dass. I'm not ashamed to say that half of this novella floated over my head or passed through my brain without sticking. I loved the funny bits in the other half though. Read full review

Review: Seize the Day

User Review  - David Ranney - Goodreads

“I want to tell you, don't marry suffering. Some people do. They get married to it, and sleep and eat together, just as husband and wife. If they go with joy they think it's adultery.” and “If you ... Read full review

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About the author (2003)

Saul Bellow was born in Lachine, Quebec, Canada on June 10, 1915. He attended the University of Chicago, received a Bachelor's degree in sociology and anthropology from Northwestern University in 1937, and did graduate work at the University of Wisconsin. He taught at several universities including the University of Minnesota, Princeton University, the University of Chicago, New York University, and Boston University. His first novel, Dangling Man, was published in 1944. His other works include The Victim, Seize the Day, Henderson the Rain King, Mosby's Memoirs and Other Stories, To Jerusalem and Back: A Personal Account, Him with His Foot in His Mouth and Other Stories, More Die of Heartbreak, and Something to Remember Me By. He received numerous awards including the 1975 Pulitzer Prize for Humboldt's Gift, the 1976 Nobel Prize in Literature, and three National Book Awards for fiction for The Adventures of Augie March in 1954, Herzog in 1964, and Mr. Sammler's Planet in 1970. Also a playwright, he wrote The Last Analysis and three short plays, collectively entitled Under the Weather, which were produced on Broadway in 1966. He died on April 5, 2005.

Writer Cynthia Ozick was born on April 17, 1928. She grew up in the Bronx and attended New York University, where she earned a B. A., and The Ohio State University, where she completed her master's degree in English literature with a specific focus on Henry James's works. Ozick wrote the novel Trust, and the short stories "The Sense of Europe", which was published in Prairie Schooner, and "The Shawl", which was included in The World of the Short Story. Her work has also appeared in The New Yorker, Harper's, Partisan Review, and Esquire. Ozick has received a Guggenheim Fellowship and a Harold Straus Living Award from the American Academy and National Institute of Arts and Letters. Three of her stories won first prize in the O. Henry competition. In 1986, she was selected as the first winner of the Rea Award for the Short Story. In 2000, she won the National Book Critics Circle Award for Quarrel & Quandary. Her novel Heir to the Glimmering World (2004) won high literary praise. Ozick was on the shortlist for the 2005 Man Booker International Prize, and in 2008 she was awarded the PEN/Nabokov Award and the PEN/Malamud Award, which was established by Bernard Malamud┐s family to honor excellence in the art of the short story. Her novel Foreign Bodies was shortlisted for the Orange Prize (2012).

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