Du Contrat Social

Front Cover
Penguin, 1968 - Philosophy - 187 pages
28 Reviews
Rejecting the view that anyone has a natural right to wield authority over others, Rousseau argues instead for a pact, or 'social contract', that should exist between all the citizens of a state and that should be the source of sovereign power.
 

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User Review  - greeniezona - LibraryThing

I continue to love the Penguin Great Ideas series. Though the simple inclusion of a date of original publication would be very nice. Anyway, the book is a discussion of governments. Ideal governments ... Read full review

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User Review  - P_S_Patrick - LibraryThing

Here Rousseau introduces the idea of the "Social Contract" as being the establishing force behind structured civil society, governments, and states. The social contract is a mutually beneficial ... Read full review

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Contents

Translators acknowledgements
7
Introduction
9
Foreword
47
BOOK I
49
BOOK II
69
BOOK III
101
BOOK IV
149
Copyright

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About the author (1968)

Jean-Jacques Rousseau (1712-78) the French political philosopher and educationalist, is the author of A Discourse on Inequality, and Emile.Maurice Cranston was Professor of Political Science at the London School of Economics and wrote and published widely on Rousseau, including two volumes of biography.

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