The Early Years of the Saturday Club, 1855-1870

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Houghton Mifflin, 1918 - American literature - 515 pages
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Page 132 - And Nature, the old nurse, took The child upon her knee, Saying : " Here is a story-book Thy Father has written for thee." " Come, wander with me," she said, " Into regions yet untrod ; And read what is still unread In the manuscripts of God.
Page 202 - I believe that to have interfered as I have done - as I have always freely admitted I have done - in behalf of His despised poor was not wrong, but right. Now, if it is deemed necessary that I should forfeit my life for the furtherance of the ends of justice, and mingle my blood further with the blood of my children and with the blood of millions in this slave country whose rights are disregarded by wicked, cruel, and unjust enactments - I submit; so let it be done!
Page 409 - THOU hidden love of God, whose height, Whose depth unfathomed no man knows; I see from far thy beauteous light, Inly I sigh for thy repose. My heart is pained ; nor can it be At rest, till it find rest in thee.
Page 315 - Stainless soldier on the walls, Knowing this, — and knows no more, — Whoever fights, whoever falls, Justice conquers evermore, Justice after as before, — And he who battles on her side, God, though he were ten times slain, Crowns him victor glorified, Victor over death and pain...
Page 289 - The Spirit of the LORD is upon Me, Because He has anointed Me to preach the gospel to the poor. He has sent Me to heal the brokenhearted, To preach deliverance to the captives And recovery of sight to the blind, To set at liberty those who are oppressed, To preach the acceptable year of the LORD.
Page 202 - I believe that to have interfered as I have done, as I have always freely admitted I have done, in behalf of His despised poor, was not wrong but right. Now, if it is deemed necessary that I should forfeit my life for the furtherance of the ends of justice and mingle my blood further with the blood of my children and with the blood of millions in this slave country, whose rights are disregarded by wicked, cruel, and unjust enactments, I submit. So let it be done.
Page 450 - HOW happy is he born and taught That serveth not another's will; Whose armour is his honest thought, And simple truth his utmost skill...
Page 181 - ON the library wall of one of the most famous writers of America, there hang two crossed swords, which his relatives wore in the great War of Independence. The one sword was gallantly drawn in the service of the king, the other was the weapon of a brave and honoured republican soldier. The possessor of the harmless trophy has earned for himself a name alike honoured in his ancestors' country and his own, where genius such as his has always a peaceful welcome.
Page 306 - I break your bonds and masterships, And I unchain the slave : Free be his heart and hand henceforth As wind and wandering wave.
Page 343 - How beautiful it was, that one bright day In the long week of rain ! Though all its splendor could not chase away The omnipresent pain. The lovely town was white with appleblooms, And the great elms o'erhead Dark shadows wove on their aerial looms Shot through with golden thread. Across the meadows, by the gray old manse, The historic river flowed : I was as one who wanders in a...

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