A Brief History of Time: From the Big Bang to Black Holes

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Bantam Press, 1988 - Cosmology - 198 pages
1839 Reviews
Provides an introduction to today's scientific ideas about the cosmos and reviews past theories. Also covers black holes, quarks, antimatter, and other mysteries of physics.

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The introduction to relativity was good. - LibraryThing
This makes the visualization of them very difficult. - LibraryThing
Just a little dated, but he's an entertaining writer. - LibraryThing
I do think his explanations are lucid and elegant. - LibraryThing

Review: A Brief History of Time

User Review  - Pamela Shropshire - Goodreads

It has taken me over a month to complete this book, but with my limited brain, I had to consume it in small chunks and often go back and reread bits. Even now, I am certainly not going to pretend that ... Read full review

Review: A Brief History of Time

User Review  - James Henderson - Goodreads

Not only is Stephen Hawking a remarkable human being who inspires us all, he's also a great story teller on a human level. Read full review

About the author (1988)

Stephen William Hawking was born on January 8, 1942 in Oxford, England. As a student at Oxford University, Hawking studied Physics, and after three years was awarded a first class honors degree in Natural Science. After gaining a Ph.D. from Cambridge, Hawking became a Research Fellow, and later on a Professional Fellow at Gonville and Caius College. Widely regarded as one of the greatest theoretical physicists since Einstein, Hawking has held the post as Lucasian Professor of Mathematics at the University of Cambridge since 1979. Most famous for his research on black holes, he has written the books A Brief History of Time and Black Holes and Baby Universes, a collection of essays published in 1993. Also the author of numerous articles for scientific papers, Hawking has 12 honorary degrees and is a Fellow of The Royal Society and a Member of the U.S. National Academy of Sciences. Hawking was diagnosed with Lou Gehrig's disease in his early 20s and is now confined to a wheelchair. He uses a computer device to help him speak. Hawking holds a professorship at the University of Oxford.

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