Travels in Asia and Africa: Including a Journey from Scanderoon to Aleppo, and Over the Desert to Bagdad and Bussora, a Voyage from Bussora to Bombay, and Along the Western Coast of India, a Voyage from Bombay to Mocha and Suez in the Red Sea, and a Journey from Suez to Cairo and Rosetta, in Egypt

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Longman, Hurst, Rees and Orme, 1808 - Asia - 346 pages
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Page 214 - Near the dockvard is a rope walk, which for length, situation, and convenience equals any in England, that in the King's Yard, at Portsmouth, only excepted, and, like that, it has a covering to shelter the workmen from the inclemency of the weather in all seasons. Here are made cables and all sorts of lesser cordage, both for the Royal Navy, the Company's Marine, and the Merchant ships, which trade to these ports of India. Besides cordage made of hemp, cables, hawsers, and all kinds of smaller ropes...
Page 132 - Mesopotamia!! side there are not any farms, as the hordes of Arabs supply all the provisions, excepting grain, which all grows on this side the river. The storks come here about the middle of March in great abundance, and return again some time in July with their young, which are hatched here. They make their nests on the tops of the highest buildings, such as the columns of the mosques, notwithstanding they are covered with glazed...
Page 133 - At length the 25th of July arrived, the day on which they took their final departure for this year: early in the morning they all collected and formed themselves into four divisions, and flew, or rather sailed round the city, very leisurely and not very high; then continued...
Page 216 - The Town of Bombay is near a mile in length from Apollo gate to that of the Bazar and about a quarter of a mile broad in the broadest part from the Bunda...
Page 18 - ... plain, at the end •of which commences the third pass, which is cut through a very high and' rocky mountain, so very steep, that to ascend or descend it the horses, camels, &c. are obliged to make a zig-zag track. The pass itself is crooked, about twenty feet wide, and from, the top- to the bottom two hundred and seven yards.
Page 163 - At four this afternoon, the sun then shining bright, a total darkness commenced in an instant, when a dreadful consternation seized every person in the city, the people running backward and forward in the streets, tumbling over one another, quite distracted, while those in the houses ran out in amazement, doubting whether it were an eclipse, or the end of 'the world. Soon after the black cloud which had caused this total darkness approached near the city, preceded by as loud a noise as I ever heard...
Page 174 - ... young gentleman, who was so obliging as to stay for me), rose immediately, and made the best of their way for the creek's mouth. In our way, the women threw tiles and stones at us from the tops of our houses, though we called to them in Arabic, to forbear, as we were English: they answered we lied, for that we were Agema (Persians) in English dress: but as it was so very dark that we could not see each other at four yards...
Page 164 - ... the decks ; and that after it was over, every place below on board the ships was covered with dust. Such a phenomenon never was known before in the memory of the oldest man now living at Bussora.
Page 215 - ... well finished as ships built in any part of Europe ; the timber and plank of which they are built, so far exceeds any in Europe for durability, that it is usual for ships to last fifty or sixty years ; as a proof of which I am informed that the ship called the
Page 163 - The dust was so subfile, and the hurricane so furious, that every room in the British factory was covered with it, notwithstanding we had the precaution to shut the doors and windows on the first appearance of the darkness, and to light candles. At half past five the cloud had passed the city, the sun instantly shone out, no wind was to be heard, nor dust felt, but all was quite serene and calm again, when all of us in the -factory -went on the terrace, and observed the cloud had entirely passed...

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