Penny Cyclopaedia of the Society for the Diffusion of Useful Knowledge, Volume 1

Front Cover
0 Reviews
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 107 - By supposition, as place is introduced, time may be extended; the time required by the fable elapses for the most part between the acts; for of so much of the action as is represented the real and poetical duration is the same.
Page 198 - Wherefore, my brethren, when ye come together to eat, tarry one for another. And if any man hunger, let him eat at home ; that ye come not together unto condemnation.
Page 16 - second, having endeavoured to subvert the constitution of " the kingdom, by breaking the original contract between " king and people — and, by the advice of Jesuits and other " wicked persons, having violated the fundamental laws, " and having withdrawn himself out of this kingdom — has " abdicated the government, and that the throne is thereby
Page 79 - As furnishing him with a horse to escape his pursuers, money or victuals to support him, a house or other shelter to conceal him, or open force and violence to rescue or protect him.
Page 107 - Time is, of all modes of existence, most obsequious to the imagination ; a lapse of years is as easily conceived as a passage of hours. In contemplation we easily contract the time of real actions, and therefore willingly permit it to be contracted when we only see their imitation.
Page 255 - That thirty-six sections, or one entire township, which shall be designated by the President of the United States, together with the one heretofore reserved for that purpose, shall be reserved for the use of a seminary of learning, and vested in the Legislature of the said State, to be appropriated solely to the use of such seminary by the said Legislature.
Page 13 - I have somewhere heard or read the frank confession of a Benedictine abbot: "My vow of poverty has given me a hundred thousand crowns a year; my vow of obedience has raised me to the rank of a sovereign prince.
Page 236 - ... man to tread on the surface of the earth, the eagle to soar in the expanse of the skies, and the monkey and squirrel to inhabit the trees: still these may change their relative situations without feeling much inconvenience: but the sloth is doomed to spend his whole life in the trees; and, what is more extraordinary, not upon the branches, like the squirrel and the monkey, but under them. He moves suspended from the branch, he rests suspended from it, and he sleeps suspended from it.
Page 119 - Therefore the Jews of the villages, that dwelt in the unwalled towns, made the fourteenth day of the month Adar a day of gladness and feasting, and a good day, and of sending portions one to another.
Page 171 - As a husband is related by affinity to all the consanguinei of his wife, and vice versa, the wife to all the husband's consanguinei; for the husband and wife being considered one flesh, those who are related to the one by blood are related to the other by affinity. Therefore a man, after his wife's death, cannot marry her sister, aunt, or niece.

Bibliographic information