Supplement to The Revised Code of Virginia: Being a Collection of All the Acts of the General Assembly, of a Public and Permanent Nature, Passed Since the Year 1819 ... To which are Prefixed, the Acts Organizing a Convention, the Declaration of Rights, and the Amended Constitution of Virginia

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Samuel Shepherd, 1833 - Law - 584 pages
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Page 15 - That religion or the duty which we owe to our Creator, and the manner of discharging it, can be directed only by reason and conviction, not by force or violence ; and, therefore, all men are equally entitled to the free exercise of religion, according to the dictates of conscience ; and that it is the mutual duty of all to practice Christian forbearance, love and charity towards each other.
Page 14 - That no man, or set of men, are entitled to exclusive or separate emoluments or privileges from the community, but in consideration of public services; which, not being descendible, neither ought the offices of magistrate, legislator, or judge to be hereditary.
Page 13 - That all men are by nature equally free and independent, and have certain inherent rights, of which, when they enter into a state of society, they cannot, by any compact, deprive or divest their posterity; namely, the enjoyment of life and liberty, with the means of acquiring and possessing property, and pursuing and obtaining happiness and safety.
Page 20 - No senator or representative shall, during the time for which he shall have been elected, be appointed to any civil office of profit under this State, which shall have been created, or the emoluments of which shall have been increased, during such term, except such offices as may be filled by elections by the people.
Page 20 - That no man shall be compelled to frequent or support any religious worship, place or ministry whatsoever, nor shall be enforced, restrained, molested or burthened, in his body or goods, nor shall otherwise suffer on account of his religious opinions or belief...
Page 14 - ... state ; that standing armies in time of peace should be avoided as dangerous to liberty ; and that in all cases the military should be under strict subordination to, and governed by, the civil power.
Page 215 - The Condition of this Obligation is such, that if the above bounden Administrator of all and singular the Goods Chattels and Credits of Deceased, do make or cause to be made a true and perfect Inventory of all and singular the Goods Chattels and Credits...
Page 14 - That the freedom of the press is one of the great bulwarks of liberty, and can never be restrained but by despotic governments. 1 3. That a well regulated militia, composed of the body of the people, trained to arms, is the proper, natural, and safe defence of a free State ; that standing armies, in time of peace, should be avoided, as dangerous to liberty ; and that, in all cases, the military should be under...
Page 144 - In the presence of the court or so near thereto as to interfere directly with the administration of justice...

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