Correspondence and Disquotation: An Essay on the Nature of Truth

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Oxford University Press, 1994 - History - 206 pages
Marian David defends the correspondence theory of truth against the disquotational theory of truth, its current major rival. The correspondence theory asserts that truth is a philosophically rich and profound notion in need of serious explanation. Disquotationalists offer a radically deflationary account inspired by Tarski and propagated by Quine and others. They reject the correspondence theory, insist truth is anemic, and advance an "anti-theory" of truth that is essentially a collection of platitudes: "Snow is white" is true if and only if snow is white; "Grass is green" is true if and only if grass is green. According to disquotationalists, the only profound insight about truth is that it lacks profundity. David contrasts the correspondence theory with disquotationalism and then develops the latter position in rich detail - more than has been available in previous literature - to show its faults. He demonstrates that disquotationalism is not a tenable theory of truth, as it has too many absurd consequences.
 

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Contents

Introduction
3
2 Correspondence and Disquotation
5
3 The Theory of Truth
7
4 The Structure of a Theory of Truth
10
5 Sentences as Truth Bearers
13
Correspondence
17
2 Falsehood and Content
25
3 Representing States of Affairs That Obtain
31
6 Varieties of Deflationism
104
Problems for Disquotationalism
107
2 Recursive Disquotation
110
3 Recursive Correspondence and Recursive Misquotation
119
Ideological Autonomy
124
Necessity and Subjunctives
130
Foreigners and Isolationism
135
7 Indexing Truth
139

4 Some Refinements
40
5 Expressing True Propositions
45
6 A General Correspondence Theory of Truth
49
Motivations for Deflationism
52
Eliminative Physicalism
55
Disquotation
61
2 An Objection to Simple Disquotation
70
3 Disquotationalism
73
4 Disquotation and Substitutional Quantification
78
5 Disquotation and Infinite Lists
93
Falsehood Declaratives Ambiguity and Indexicals
148
Specifying Idiolects
158
10 Mental Disquotation
166
11 Translational Disquotationalism
177
Embrace Disquotationalism?
187
The Disquotational Liar
189
References
193
Index
199
Copyright

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About the author (1994)

Marian David is at University of Notre Dame.

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