The Annals of Philosophy, Volume 4

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Baldwin, Craddock, and Joy, 1814 - Agriculture
 

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Page 55 - From these circumstances we have sufficient reason to conclude, that water is composed of a single ultimate particle of oxygen, and an ultimate particle of hydrogen, and that its atoms are incapable of uniting to a third particle of either of its constituents.
Page 448 - Having given the radius of an arc of any colour in the secondary rainbow, find the ratio of the sine of incidence to the sine of refraction when rays of that colour pass out of air into water.
Page 410 - ... millions of yards. According to this statement, the Newcastle coals may be mined to the present extent for 1500 years before they be exhausted. But from this number we must deduct the amount of the years during which they have been already wrought. We need not be afraid then, of any sudden injury to Great Britain from the exhaustion of the coal mines. It is necessary to keep in mind, likewise, that I have taken the greatest thickness of the coal-beds.
Page 447 - An account of Observations made at the Observatory of Trinity College, Dublin, with an Astronomical Circle, eight feet in diameter, which appear to point out an annual parallax in certain fixed Stars : Also a Catalogue of North Polar Distances...
Page 176 - ... same that would be obtained by arithmetical computation. Those who are acquainted with the doctrine of ratios, and with the use of logarithms as measures of ratios, will understand the principle on which this scale is founded, and will not need to be told that all the divisions are logometric, and consequently that the mechanical addition and subtraction of ratios here performed by juxta-position...
Page 175 - Plate [XXII.], in which will be seen the list of substances intended to be estimated, arranged on one or the other side of a scale of numbers in the order of their relative weights, and at such distances from each other, according to their weights, that the series of numbers placed on a sliding scale can at pleasure...
Page 410 - Now as this thickness is far from uniform, a considerable deduction (I should conceive one-third of the whole) must be made in order to obtain the medium thickness ; so that we may state in round numbers that this formation, at the present rate of waste, will supply...
Page 3 - ... the germs of the most approved elementary works on the different branches of this science. The constant reply of one of the first mathematicians* of France to those who consulted him upon the best method of studying mathematics was, ' study Euler.' ' It is needless,' said he, ' to accumulate books; true lovers of mathematics will always read Euler; because in his writings every thing is clear, distinct and correct; because they swarm with excellent examples ; and because it is always necessary...
Page 78 - The minimum of the barometer for the period is somewhat uncertain, from the loss of three days' observations about the time of its occurrence : the depression was followed by frost, as iĽ frequently the case when much rain has fallen. The first of the present month was a contrast to the same of last year, when the thermometer rose to 85į ; yet it is observable that the same low temperature occurred then also four days afterwards. On the whole this period has been more changeable than we should...
Page 212 - Kocou contains an aroma, an acid, resin combined with the colouring matter, vegetable mucilage, fibrin, coloured extractive, and a peculiar matter which approaches to mucilage and extractive. This analysis explains the reason why an alkali is* added to rocou when it is employed in dyeing. The alkali combines with the resin, and forms a soap which dissolves in water. The alkali acts likewise on the colouring matter, and renders 'it more lively. The second section of Dr. John's work contains observations...

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