Biodegradable Polymers and Plastics

Front Cover
Emo Chiellini, Roberto Solaro
Springer Science & Business Media, Oct 31, 2003 - Nature - 395 pages
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Proceedings of The 7th World Conference on Biodegradable Polymers & Plastics organized by the European Degradable Polymer Society in conjunction with the Bioenvironmental Polymer Society and the Biodegradale Plastics Society, under the auspices of ICS-UNIDO (Italy) and INSTM Consortium (Italy) and under the patronage of IUPAC - International Union of Pure and Applied Chemistry (USA) and Ministero dell'Ambiente e della Tutela del Territorio (Italy), held in Tirrenia (Pisa), Italy, on June 4-8, 2002.
Synthetic and semi-synthetic polymeric materials were originally developed for their durability and resistance to all forms of degradation including biodegradation. Such materials are currently widely accepted because of their ease of processability and amenability to provide a large variety of cost effective items that help to enhance the comfort and quality of life in the modern industrial society. However, this widespread utilization of plastics has contributed to a serious plastic waste burden, and the expectation for the 21st century is for an increased demand for polymeric material.
This volume focuses on a more rational utilization of resources in the fabrication, consumption and disposal of plastic items, specifically:

-Environmentally Degradable Polymeric Materials (EDPs);
-Water-soluble/Swellable Biodegradable Polymers;
-EDPs from Renewable Resources;
-Biopolymers;
-Bioresorbable Materials for Biomedical Applications;
-Biorelated Polymers;
-Standards and Regulations on EDPs.

 

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Contents

Contents
3
Conclusions
7
Characterisation of Biodegradable Polymers
18
ScienceBased Standards for Degradable Polymers
24
Chapter 10
31
BIODEGRAD ABILITY AND COMPOST ABILITY
33
the EN 1343 2
36
SAWADA HIDEO Biodegradable Plastics Society Grande bldg 269 Hatchobori 2
47
Conclusions
220
Chapter 13
223
Degradation of End Group Modified Polylactides
229
MANO JOAO F Department of Polymer Engineering University of Minho Campus
243
SOLARO ROBERTO Department of Chemistry Industrial Chemistry University of Pisa
261
MARECHAL FREDDY APME Technical Environmental Centre
273
Theoretical Background
274
SWIFT GRAHAM GS Polymer Consultants 1078 Eastchurch Chapel Hill North Carolina
291

Results and Discussion
51
PARTI
59
Conclusions
65
Conclusions
71
Chapter 7
83
Are We Critical Enough?
92
Chapter 8
100
Saccharide and LigninBased PCL Derivatives
112
YAN Kaufert Laboratory University of Minnesota 2004 Folwell Avenue St Paul
121
Towards the first Thermoplastics with High Lignin Contents
127
Alkylated Kraft LigninBased Thermoplastics
136
SCOTT GERALD Aston University Birmingham
141
Results and Discussion
145
Conclusions
151
Production of Polyhydroxyalkanoates PHA
157
Application of Polyhydroxyalkanoates as Biomaterials
163
Introduction
172
SMITH DAWN A Institute of Materials Science University of Connecticut Storrs
213
Experimental Methods
215
Epoxidation Reaction
305
10Epoxyundecanoic Acid as Nutrient 5 Radical Addition to Double Bonds 6 Oxidative Reaction of Unsaturated PHAS
308
Conclusions
309
Chapter 21
313
Mechanical Properties
315
Degradable Plastic Additive Technology
316
Laboratory Studies of Degradation
317
Outdoor Degradation
320
Field Experience 7 Composting and Biodegradation
322
Conclusions
324
PAUL MARIEAMELIE Laboratory of Polymeric and Composite Materials University
327
Layered Silicate as Nanofiller
329
PCL Based Nanocomposites 4 PLA Based Nanocomposites by Melt Intercalation
331
Chapter 23
351
Results and Discussion
353
Index
365
Bioactivity Tests
376
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