Voices of Hope, and Other Messages from the Hills: A Series of Essays on the Problem of Life, Optimism, and the Christ

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G.H. Ellis, 1898 - New Thought - 213 pages
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Page 149 - Go from me. Yet I feel that I shall stand Henceforward in thy shadow. Nevermore Alone upon the threshold of my door Of individual life, I shall command The uses of my soul, nor lift my hand Serenely in the sunshine as before, Without the sense of that which I forbore — Thy touch upon the palm. The widest land Doom takes to part us, leaves thy heart in mine With pulses that beat double. What I do And what I dream include thee, as the wine Must taste of its own grapes. And when I sue God for myself,...
Page 141 - Most quiet need, by sun and candlelight. I love thee freely, as men strive for Right ; I love thee purely, as they turn from Praise ; I love thee with the passion put to use In my old griefs, and with my childhood's faith. I love thee with a love I seemed to lose With my lost saints, — I love thee with the breath, Smiles, tears, of all my life ! — and, if God choose, I shall but love thee better after death.
Page 86 - gainst time or fate, For, lo! my own shall come to me. I stay my haste, I make delays; For what avails this eager pace? I stand amid the eternal ways, And what is mine shall know my face. Asleep, awake, by night or day, The friends I seek are seeking me; No wind can drive my bark astray, Nor change the tide of destiny. What matter if I stand alone?
Page 86 - I stand amid the eternal ways, And what is mine shall know my face. Asleep, awake, by night or day, The friends I seek are seeking me ; No wind can drive my bark astray, Nor change the tide of destiny. What matter if I stand alone? I wait with joy the coming years; My heart shall reap where it has sown, And garner up its fruit of tears. The waters know their own and draw The brook that springs in yonder height; So flows the good with equal law Unto the soul of pure delight.
Page 47 - I am a part of all that I have met ; Yet all experience is an arch wherethrough Gleams that untravelled world, whose margin fades Forever and forever when I move.
Page 86 - Serene I fold my hands and wait, Nor care for wind, nor tide, nor sea; I rave no more 'gainst time nor fate, For lo! my own shall come to me.
Page 149 - The face of all the world is changed, I think, Since first I heard the footsteps of thy soul Move still, oh. still, beside me, as they stole Betwixt me and the dreadful outer brink Of obvious death, where I, who thought to sink, Was caught up into love, and taught the whole Of life in a new rhythm.
Page 141 - For these things in themselves, Beloved, may Be changed, or change for thee, - and love, so wrought, May be unwrought so. Neither love me for Thine own dear pity's wiping my cheeks dry, — A creature might forget to weep, who bore Thy comfort long, and lose thy love thereby! But love me for love's sake, that evermore Thou mayst love on, through love's eternity.
Page 141 - IF thou must love me, let it be for nought Except for love's sake only. Do not say ' I love her for her smile . . her look . . her way Of speaking gently, . . for a trick of thought That falls in well with mine, and certes brought A sense of pleasant ease on such a day ' — For these things in themselves.
Page 43 - These, then, are my last words to you: Be not afraid of life. Believe that life is worth living, and your belief will help create the fact.

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