Cosmological Physics

Front Cover
Cambridge University Press, 1999 - Science - 682 pages
2 Reviews
This textbook provides advanced undergraduate and graduate students with a complete introduction to modern cosmology. It successfully bridges the gap between undergraduate and advanced graduate texts by discussing topics of current research, starting from first principles. Throughout this authoritative volume, emphasis is given to the simplest, most intuitive explanation for key equations used by researchers. The first third of the book carefully develops the necessary background in general relativity and quantum fields. The rest of the book then provides self-contained accounts of all the key topics in contemporary cosmology, including inflation, topological defects, gravitational lensing, galaxy formation, large-scale structure and the distance scale. To aid understanding, the book is well illustrated with helpful figures and includes outline solutions to more than ninety problems. All necessary astronomical jargon is clearly explained, ensuring the book is self-contained for any student with undergraduate physics.
 

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that's good for students of astrophysics

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This book is really good. It has a strong overview of many different aspects of cosmology. However, there are some significant typos. I would strongly recommend that anyone who uses this book should consult the errata (http://www.roe.ac.uk/~jap/book/errata.html).

Contents

Essentials of general relativity
3
12 The equation of motion
9
13 Tensors and relativity
11
14 The energymomentum tensor
17
15 The field equations
19
16 Alternative theories of gravity
26
17 Relativity and differential geometry
28
Astrophysical relativity
35
Topological defects
305
102 Classes of topological defect
306
103 Magnetic monopoles
310
104 Cosmic strings and structure formation
313
Inflationary cosmology
323
112 An overview of inflation
325
113 Inflation field dynamics
328
114 Inflation models
335

22 Weak fields
38
23 Gravitational radiation
42
24 The binary pulsar
49
25 Black holes
51
26 Accretion onto black holes
60
Classical cosmology
63
The isotropic universe
65
32 Dynamics of the expansion
72
33 Common big bang misconceptions
86
34 Observations in cosmology
89
35 The anthropic principle
94
Gravitational lensing
101
42 Simple lens models
105
43 General properties of thin lenses
109
44 Observations of gravitational lensing
113
45 Microlensing
116
46 Darkmatter mapping
121
The age and distance scales
127
52 Methods for age determination
128
53 Largescale distance measurements
134
54 The local distance scale
138
55 Direct distance determinations
141
56 Summary
145
Basics of quantum fields
149
Quantum mechanics and relativity
151
62 The Dirac equation
158
63 Symmetries
164
64 Spinors and complex numbers
167
Quantum field theory
177
72 Simple quantum electrodynamics
181
73 Lagrangians and fields
184
74 Interacting fields
189
75 Feynman diagrams
197
76 Renormalization
205
77 Path integrals
210
The standard model and beyond
215
82 Gauge symmetries and conservation laws
216
83 The weak interaction
220
84 NonAbelian gauge symmetries
223
85 Spontaneous symmetry breaking
228
86 The electroweak model
232
87 Quantum chromodynamics
236
88 Beyond the standard model
245
89 Neutrino masses and mixing
251
810 Quantum gravity
256
811 KaluzaKlein models
265
812 Supersymmetry and beyond
267
The early universe
271
The hot big bang
273
92 Relics of the big bang
282
93 The physics of recombination
284
94 The microwave background
288
95 Primordial nucleosynthesis
292
96 Baryogenesis
300
115 Relic fluctuations from inflation
338
116 Conclusions
347
Observational cosmology
351
Matter in the universe
353
122 Intervening absorbers
360
123 Evidence for dark matter
367
124 Baryonic dark matter
378
125 Nonbaryonic dark matter
381
Galaxies and their evolution
387
132 Optical and infrared observations
394
133 Luminosity functions
399
134 Evolution of galaxy stellar populations
404
135 Galaxy counts and evolution
406
136 Galaxies at high redshift
412
Active galaxies
419
142 Emission mechanisms
423
143 Extended radio sources
431
144 Beaming and unified schemes
437
145 Evolution of active galaxies
441
146 Black holes as central engines
447
147 Black hole masses and demographics
451
Galaxy formation and clustering
455
Dynamics of structure formation
457
152 Dynamics of linear perturbations
460
153 The peculiar velocity field
469
154 Coupled perturbations
471
155 The full treatment
474
156 Transfer functions
477
157 Nbody models
482
158 Nonlinear models
485
Cosmological density fields
495
162 Fourier analysis of density fluctuations
496
163 Gaussian density fields
503
164 Nonlinear clustering evolution
509
165 Redshiftspace effects
514
166 Lowdimensional density fields
517
167 Measuring the clustering spectrum
521
168 The observed clustering spectrum
526
169 NonGaussian density fields
536
1610 Peculiar velocity fields
543
Galaxy formation
553
172 Hierarchies and the PressSchechter approach
556
173 Cooling and the intergalactic medium
569
174 Chemical evolution of galaxies
575
175 Biased galaxy formation
578
Cosmic background fluctuations
587
182 Characteristics of CMB anisotropies
597
183 Observations of CMB anisotropies
601
184 Conclusions and outlook
603
Hints for solution of the problems
613
Bibliography and references
647
Useful numbers and formulae
663
Index
671
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Modern Cosmology
Scott Dodelson
Limited preview - 2003
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About the author (1999)

Peacock, Royal Observatory, Edinburgh, UK.

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