The Pig: a Treatise on the Breeds, Management, Feeding, and Medical Treatment of Swine, Etc

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1847
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Page 146 - See him in the dish, his second cradle, how meek he lieth! Wouldst thou have had this innocent grow up to the grossness and indocility which too often accompany maturer swinehood? Ten to one he would have proved a glutton, a sloven, an obstinate, disagreeable animal, wallowing in all manner of filthy conversation; from these sins he is happily snatched away — Ere sin could blight or sorrow fade, Death came with timely care.
Page 146 - Pig, let me speak his praise, is no less provocative of the ' appetite than he is satisfactory to the criticalness of the censorious palate. The strong man may batten on him, and the weakling refuseth not his mild juices. Unlike to mankind's mixed characters, a bundle of virtues and vices, inexplicably intertwisted, and not to be unraveled without hazard, he is good throughout.
Page 145 - There is no flavour comparable, I will contend, to that of the crisp, tawny, well-watched, not over-roasted crackling, as it is well called ; the very teeth are invited to their share of the pleasure at this banquet in overcoming the coy, brittle resistance, with the adhesive oleaginous.
Page 145 - ... his voice as yet not broken, but something between a childish treble and a grumble — the mild forerunner or prtzludium of a grunt. He must be roasted. I am not ignorant that our ancestors ate them seethed, or boiled ; but what a sacrifice of the exterior tegument...
Page 12 - From oak to oak they run with eager haste, And wrangling share the first delicious taste Of fallen ACORNS ; yet but thinly found Till the strong gale has shook them to the ground.
Page 146 - His memory is odoriferous ; no clown curseth, while his stomach half rejecteth, the rank bacon ; no coalheaver bolteth him in reeking sausages ; he hath a fair sepulchre in the grateful stomach of the judicious epicure, and for such a tomb might be content to die.
Page 146 - O call it not fat! but an indefinable sweetness growing up to it — the tender blossoming of fat, fat cropped in the bud, taken in the shoot, in the first innocence — the cream and quintessence of the child-pig's yet pure food; the lean...
Page 146 - He is all neighbours' fare. I am one of those who freely and ungrudgingly impart a share of the good things of this life which fall to their lot (few as mine are in this kind) to a friend. I protest I take as great an interest in my friend's...
Page 145 - ... the hereditary failing of the first parent, yet manifest — his voice as yet not broken, but something between a childish treble, and a grumble — the mild forerunner, or prceludium, of a grunt.
Page 10 - ... the former of which he prefers when he can have it in abundance. He fixes next on some spreading tree, round the bole of which he wattles a slight circular fence of the dimensions he wants ; and, covering it roughly with boughs and sods, he fills it plentifully with straw or fern. Having made this preparation, he collects his colony among the farmers, with whom he commonly agrees for a shilling a head, and will get together perhaps a herd of five or six hundred hogs.

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