The Case-book of Sherlock Holmes

Front Cover
.0000000000The Casebook of Sherlock Holmes contains Conan Doyle's last twelve stories about his great fictional detective. Compared with earlier collections these tales are darker, exploring such themes as treachery, mutilation and the terrible consequences of infidelity, and containing such gothic touches as a blood-sucking vampire and crypts at midnight. With an Afterword by David Stuart Davies, a Fellow of the Royal Literary Fund, and an authority on Sherlock Holmes. He has written the Afterwords for all the Collector's Library Holmes volumes.
 

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LibraryThing Review

User Review  - loraineo - LibraryThing

The last collection of Sherlock Holmes short stories. Reprinted from the Strand Magazine. The illustrations are great.. fun to read and re read. Read full review

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - StephenBarkley - LibraryThing

The Sherlock Holmes cannon is expansive. Sir Arthur Conan Doyle wrote 56 short stories for his detective which have been collected into 5 books. Holmes and Watson also star in four novels including ... Read full review

Selected pages

Contents

Preface
7
The Adventure of the Illustrious Client
11
The Adventure of the Blanched Soldier
44
The Adventure of the Mazarin Stone
70
The Adventure of the Three Gables
91
The Adventure of the Sussex Vampire
113
The Adventure of the Three Garridebs
134
The Problem of Thor Bridge
155
The Adventure of the Creeping Man
188
The Adventure of the Lions Mane
214
The Adventure of the Veiled Lodger
238
The Adventure of Shoscombe Old Place
253
The Adventure of the Retired Colourman
275
Afterword
295
Biography
303
Copyright

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About the author (2004)

Arthur Conan Doyle was born in Edinburgh in 1859. After a rigorous Jesuit education, at Stonyhurst College in Lancashire, he trained to be a doctor at Edinburgh University. Eventually he set up in medical practice in Southsea and, during the quiet periods between patients, he turned his hand to writing. Although Sherlock Holmes was Doyle's greatest creation, he believed his historical novels such as Micah Clarke and The White Company were of greater literary quality. He also created the irascible Professor Challenger in The Lost World and the comic French soldier Brigadier Gerard who appeared in a series of short stories. Doyle was knighted in 1902. Towards the end of his life he devoted much of his time to his belief in Spiritualism, using his writings as a means of providing funds to support his activities in this field. He died in 1930.

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