The Works of Henry Mackenzie, Esq. ...

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J. Ballantyne and Company, 1808
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Page 381 - The spirit that I have seen May be the devil : and the devil hath power To assume a pleasing shape; yea, and perhaps Out of my weakness and my melancholy, — As he is very potent with such spirits, — Abuses me to damn me: I'll have grounds More relative than this: — the play's the thing Wherein I'll catch the conscience of the king.
Page 309 - That care, however, which watched his health was not repaid with success ; he was always more delicate, and more subject to little disorders than I; and at last, after completing his seventh year, was seized with a fever, which, in a few days, put an end to his life, and transferred to me the inheritance of my ancestors.
Page 203 - forgive these tears ; assist thy servant to lift up his soul to thee; to lift to thee the souls of thy people ! My friends ! it is good so to do : at all seasons it is good; but, in the days of our distress, what a privilege it is ! Well saith the sacred book> f Trust in the Lord ; at all times trust in the Lord.
Page 183 - She was interrupted by the arrival of their landlord. He took her hand with an air of kindness : she drew it away from him in silence, threw down her eyes to the ground, and left the room. " I have been thanking God," said the good La Roche, " for my recovery." " That is right,
Page 387 - And will he not come again?' &c. But Edgar puts on a semblance as opposite as may be to his real situation and his ruling thoughts. He never ventures on any expression, bordering on the subjects of a father's cruelty, or a son's misfortune. Hamlet, in the same manner, were he as firm in mind as Edgar, would never hint...
Page 378 - O, what a noble mind is here o'erthrown! The courtier's, soldier's, scholar's, eye, tongue, sword; The expectancy and rose of the fair state, The glass of fashion and the mould of form, The observed of all observers, quite, quite down!
Page 203 - Tis only from the belief of the goodness and wisdom of a Supreme Being that our calamities can be borne in that manner which becomes a man. Human wisdom is here of little use ; for, in proportion as it bestows comfort, it represses feeling, without which we may cease to be hurt by calamity, but we shall also cease to enjoy happiness. I will not bid you be insensible, my friends ! I cannot, I cannot, if I would...
Page 200 - I have before described, in the neighborhood of La Roche's dwelling. A light gleamed on the water that seemed to proceed from the house ; it moved slowly along as he proceeded up the side of the lake, and at last he saw it glimmer through the trees, and stop at some distance from the place where he then was.
Page 378 - The observed of all observers," v placed in a situation, in which even the amiable qualities of his mind serve but to aggravate his distress, and to perplex his conduct.
Page 43 - Why, to be sure, it were often better not to fight — if one had but the courage not to fight." N 12. SATURDAY, MARCH 6, 1779. ' To THE AUTHOR OF THE MIRROR. •SIR, ' I AM a plain country-gentleman with a small fortune and a large family. My boys, all except the youngest, I have contrived to set out into the world in tolerably promising situations. My two eldest girls are married; one to a clergyman, with a very comfortable living, and a respectable character ; the other to a neighbour of my...

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