The Flaming Womb: Repositioning Women in Early Modern Southeast Asia

Front Cover
University of Hawaii Press, 2006 - Social Science - 335 pages
0 Reviews
The Princess of the Flaming Womb, the Javanese legend that introduces this pioneering study, symbolizes the many ambiguities attached to femaleness in Southeast Asian societies. Yet, despite these ambiguities, the relatively egalitarian nature of male-female relations in Southeast Asia is central to arguments claiming a coherent identity for the region. This challenging work by senior scholar Barbara Watson Andaya considers such contradictions while offering a thought-provoking view of Southeast Asian history that focuses on women's roles and perceptions. Andaya explores the broad themes of the early modern era (1500-1800) - the introduction of new religions, major economic shifts, changing patterns of state control, the impact of elite lifestyles and behaviors - drawing on an extraordinary range of sources and citing numerous examples from Thai, Vietnamese, Burmese, Philippine, and Malay societies.
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Contents

I
ix
II
xi
III
1
IV
11
V
42
VI
70
VII
104
VIII
134
IX
165
X
197
XI
226
XII
233
XIII
297
XIV
317
Copyright

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

About the author (2006)

Barbara Watson Andaya is professor of Asian studies and director of the Center for Southeast Asian Studies, University of Hawai'i.

Bibliographic information