Cinema: The movement-image

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U of Minnesota Press, 1986 - Performing Arts - 250 pages
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First published in France in 1983, this is at once a revolutionary work in philosophy and a book about cinema. For Deleuze, philosophy cannot be a reflection of something else; philosophical concepts are, rather, the images of thought, to be understood on their own terms. Here he puts this view of philosophy to work in understanding the concepts-or images-of film. Cinema, to Deleuze, is not a language that requires probing and interpretation, a search for hidden meanings; it can be understood directly, as a composition of images and signs, pre-verbal in nature. Thus he offers a powerful alternative to the psychoanalytic and semiological approaches that have dominated film studies. Drawing upon Henri Bergson's thesis on perception and C. S. Peirce's classification of images and signs, Deleuze is able to put forth a new theory and taxonomy of the image, which he then applies to concrete examples from the work of a diverse group of filmmakers - Griffith, Eisenstein, Pasolini, Rohmer, Bresson, Dreyer, Stroheim, Bu˝uel, and many others. Because he finds movement to be the primary characteristic of cinema in the first half of the twentieth century, he devotes this first volume to that aspect of film.
 

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yes, learning about the philosophy behind film. they take film REALLY seriously in France. oh and Denmark too. hey, just about any country in Europe that once had a monarchy. the future of ... Read full review

Contents

Theses on movement First commentary
1
The construction of anyspacewhatevers shadow
3
Frame and shot framing and cutting
12
shot and movement the two facets of
24
dialectical composition the organic
32
The movementimage and its three
56
how to extinguish the three varieties
66
liquid perception
76
From affect to action The impulse image
123
power of repetition in
130
King Vidor the case
139
The laws of organic composition
151
The sensorymotor link Kazan and the Actors Studio
157
functionalism the neoWestern
164
Figures or the transformation of forms
178
The figures of the Large and the Small in Herzog
184

The affectionimage Face and closeup
87
The affect as entity the icon Firsmess according
95
The affectionimage Qualities powers
102
The spiritual affect and space in Bresson what is
109
The crisis of the actionimage
197
Towards a beyond of the movementimage 2 11
211
Index
243
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Undisciplined Theory
Gary Genosko
Limited preview - 1998
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