Party-giving on every scale; or The cost of entertainments [&c.] by the author of 'Manners and tone of good society'.

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Page 77 - Take care of the pence and the pounds will take care of themselves is as true of personal habits as of money.
Page 53 - Lawn-tennis is now generally played at garden parties, so much so that garden parties are often designated lawn-tennis parties. In town and in the suburbs a military band is generally engaged to play from four to seven ; in town a military band means the bands of the 1st or 2nd Life Guards, or that of the Eoyal Horse Guards Blue, and the bands of the Grenadier, Coldstream, or Scots Guards.
Page 58 - When matches of lawn-tennis are played at a garden party, a table on very a^ ^ placed on the lawn, with iced drinks, sherry and seltzer-water for the benefit of the gentlemen. Sherry and seltzer is rather a favourite drink with men in general,1 and 6 to 8 bottles of sherry would probably be drunk, or even less, according to the number of gentlemen present; thus from 1$ to 3 dozen seltzer-water would be required, but ... it entirely depends upon how many gentlemen are present. In some 1 It had replaced...
Page 62 - With respect to the style of supper given on these occasions it is usually of the simplest order of ball supper; neither hot nor cold expensive entrees nor expensive sweets being provided, as the guests principally comprise very young people of both sexes, and upon whom | a supper of expensive dainties would be more or less thrown away. In | providing wine for an archery dance supper, considerably less would be required than for an ordinary ball supper, given in either town or country. Thus for a...
Page 58 - ... it entirely depends upon how many gentlemen are present. In some remote counties, for instance, the gentlemen at a garden party are represented by three or four young curates and two or three old gentlemen, while the ladies perhaps muster from forty to fifty, in which case very little wine is drunk.
Page 61 - In the latter light refreshments are served from 4 to 7; a cold collation is served in a lounge marquee at from 7 to 7.30; dancing takes place at 9 in either dining-room or drawing-room. Tea and coffee, etc., are served until 12, when a supper, on the principle of a ball supper, is given. The cold collation, or dinner, is more substantial than a ball supper, as cold lamb and cold beef are given, and bowls of salad, in addition to ham, tongues, chickens, mayonnaises, and various sweets, jellies, creams,...
Page 183 - ... that they would be dressed in different ways, boiled and fried or broiled, and that a large and a smaller kind of fish would be chosen, such as salmon and smelts, turbot and whiting, etc.
Page 62 - ... nor expensive sweets being provided, as the guests principally comprise very young people of both sexes, and upon whom a supper of expensive dainties would be more or less thrown away. In providing wine for an archery dance supper, considerably less would be required than for an ordinary ball supper, given in either town or country. Thus for a party of one hundred people, supposing seventy of the number were ladies, 3 dozen champagne would be sufficient, in addition to 1 dozen of sherry.
Page 191 - And now we come to the serious part of the dinner; and we are relieved to hear that 'It is no longer the fashion to give four entries; the number has been reduced to three at large dinner-parties, and to two at smaller dinnerparties. Formerly the entries were of a most substantial character, and invariably comprised cutlets, patties, and fillet de...
Page 35 - ... entirely apart from the general expenses of ordinary teas, where amateur talent is considered sufficiently attractive for the occasion. In town, during the season when large and fashionable afternoon at homes are given, it is usual to engage one or two celebrities in the musical world, whose talents lie either in the comic or operatic direction. The fees for such services range from 5 to 25 guineas ; comic talent, however, whether English or foreign, is most in request at these reunions.

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