Questions in Geography, Adapted for the Use of Morse's, Woodbridge's, Worcester's ... Or Any Other Respectable Collection of Maps ... : to which is Added a Concise Description of the Terrestrial Globe

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Harper & Brothers, 1855 - Geography - 114 pages
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Page 114 - To find all the places to which a lunar eclipse is visible at any instant. Find the place to which the sun is vertical at that time, and bring that place to the zenith, and set the index to the upper twelve, then turn the globe till the...
Page 108 - The two temperate, zones are all those parts lying between the tropics and the polar circles; consequently, there is one of these in the northern, and one in the southern hemisphere. We, in the United States, are inhabitants of the north temperate zone. The two frigid zones lie between the polar circles and the poles, and have their name from the excessive cold in those parts.
Page 114 - The hour at any place being given, to find •what hour it is at any other place.
Page 107 - 'arth's orbit has an inclination towards changes,' you say." " The changes in the seasons, sir, are owing to ' the inclination of the earth's axis to the plane of its orbit.
Page 23 - Mexico on the south; and from the Atlantic Ocean on the east, to the Pacific Ocean on the west.
Page 114 - Rectify for the latitude and sun's place, (Prob. vm ) and turn the sun's place to the eastern edge of the horizon, and the index will point to the hour of rising : then bring it to the western edge...
Page 114 - For the latitude : elevate the pole above the horizon according to the latitude of the place. 2. For the zenith : screw the quadrant of altitude on the meridian at the given degree of latitude, counting from the equator towards the elevated pole. 3. For the sun's place : find the sun's place on the horizon, and then bring the same place found on the ecliptic to the meridian, and set the hour index to twelve at noon.
Page 114 - VIII.) and turn the sun's place to the eastern edge of the horizon, and the index will point to the hour of rising ; then bring it to the western edge of the horizon, and the index will shew the time of setting, Ex.
Page 114 - T of the hour circle to that hour ; then turn the globe till the proposed place comes under the meridian, and the index will point to the present hour at that place.
Page 114 - Out problem may be found the length of the day and night. Double the time of the sun's setting, and it will give the length of the day. Double the time of the sun's rising, and it will give the length of the night Problem 1 1 .—Tojind all those plates in the.

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